emails postmedia – WPFG Montreal 2017 http://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 15:10:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg emails postmedia – WPFG Montreal 2017 http://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ 32 32 Ryan Reynolds shot The Adam Project in Vancouver, naturally https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ryan-reynolds-shot-the-adam-project-in-vancouver-naturally/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 02:51:34 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ryan-reynolds-shot-the-adam-project-in-vancouver-naturally/ Links to the breadcrumb Television Movies Local News local arts The Deadpool star and fellow Canadian Shawn Levy filmed their sci-fi hit in Metro Vancouver. What pitches did they use? Does this forest floor full of ferns look familiar to you? There is a reason for this. The Adam Project starring Ryan Reynolds as Big […]]]>

The Deadpool star and fellow Canadian Shawn Levy filmed their sci-fi hit in Metro Vancouver. What pitches did they use?

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Vancouver icon Ryan Reynolds has done it again for his beloved hometown.

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His latest film The Adam Project has just hit Netflix screens, climbing straight to No. 1 in Canada and the United States. And the majority of the family time travel adventure was filmed on location in British Columbia.

The dense rainforests of coastal British Columbia feature prominently in family scenes and video game-like spaceship battles.

No spoilers, by the way. The trailer reveals the premise: an adult Reynolds returns from the high-tech future to the year 2022 to join forces with his younger self to try to save the world and heal old family wounds.

Ryan Reynolds as Big Adam and Alex Mallari Jr. as Christos in a forest scene from The Adam Project.
Ryan Reynolds as Big Adam and Alex Mallari Jr. as Christos in a forest scene from The Adam Project. Photo by Doane Gregory /netflix

Landmarks like the University of British Columbia campus and the Vancouver Convention Center can be spotted along the way, as well as scenic waterfront scenes with clouds hanging low in the sky – the mission area, perhaps? — and street scenes along a classic Vancouver boulevard — could this be Cambie?

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It’s yet another Reynolds vehicle where Vancouverites can play “spot the location” for much of the movie.

Reynolds and director Shawn Levy – who worked together on last year’s hit comedy Free Guy, starring Deadpool 3 next for the duo – sing the praises of Vancouver as a film location in the promotional short Netflix in your neighborhood. Like good Canadians, they even understand the “u” in “neighbourhood”.

Levy says he fell in love with the forests along the BC coast and often hiked them on days when there was no filming. The director is a native of Montreal, so he probably knows maples better than cedars and firs.

Walker Scobell as Young Adam and Ryan Reynolds as Big Adam in the Netflix feature The Adam Project.
Walker Scobell as Young Adam and Ryan Reynolds as Big Adam in the Netflix feature The Adam Project. Photo by Doane Gregory /netflix

In the featurette, Reynolds warns Levy to try to navigate these forests using old-fashioned orienteering.

“I remember when I was a kid they used to tell us that the moss on the trees was facing north,” he says. “So if you’re lost in the woods, look where the moss is on the tree – it’s to the north.

“But don’t follow” that advice, he warns Levy, “because it’s so dense in Vancouver, and there’s so little sun, that moss is all around the trees.”

Kind of like David Duchovny’s infamous affront about rainy old vancouverbut it’s not like Reynolds is complaining.

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“I love BC’s absolutely diverse geography. It’s pretty much, I think, second to none,” he says in the Netflix interview. “You can be in the desert, you can be in a rainforest, you can be in the ocean, you can be in the snow. You can be in a metropolitan, sophisticated city.

“It’s all within an hour of each location, so it’s unrivaled as a filming location.”

(Editor’s note: Maybe he’s rigging the geography a bit here. It’ll take a little over an hour to get to a desert location from Vancouver, unless you’re using one of these ships space objects of the Adam project.)

Zoe Saldana as Laura and Ryan Reynolds as Big Adam in The Adam Project.
Zoe Saldana as Laura and Ryan Reynolds as Big Adam in The Adam Project. Photo by Doane Gregory /netflix

Levy pays tribute to the equally diverse dining experiences available in Vancouver, naming Cioppino’s for Italian, Vij’s for Indian and Tojo’s for sushi. Reynolds, for his part, praises Benny’s Bagels, which is an old hangout near his high school, and says his all-time favorite restaurant is Minerva’s on West 41st.

Levy and Reynolds also go out of their way to praise the talent and dedication of the film crews at Hollywood North, saying they were part of a “family” deeply attached to the film and its story.

The Adam Project is available now on Netflix, and co-stars Jennifer Garner, Zoe Saldaña, Mark Ruffalo and impressive newcomer Walker Scobell as a young version of Reynolds.

Did you spot a location in Vancouver in the film? Let us know in the comment section below.

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“Whirlwind of Emotions”: The Ottawa International Film Festival prepares for its first in-person screenings https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/whirlwind-of-emotions-the-ottawa-international-film-festival-prepares-for-its-first-in-person-screenings/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 12:10:42 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/whirlwind-of-emotions-the-ottawa-international-film-festival-prepares-for-its-first-in-person-screenings/ Breadcrumb Links local arts Publication date : March 04, 2022 • 55 minutes ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation OTTAWA – March 3, 2022 – Kelly Neall, Tish Chambers, Christina Frovolova- Gregory, Ben Compton, Tom McSorley, Devin Hartley, Sarah Lamoureux, Amanda Misko from the Ottawa International Film Festival. Photo by Wayne Cuddington […]]]>

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When 21-year-old filmmaker Adam Bowman was asked if he would like his short film to screen at the Ottawa International Film Festival, he didn’t hesitate to answer.

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“I was like, sure. Is that a rhetorical question?” said Bowman, a Toronto resident and director of the award-winning documentary short, A Man and His Murals.

Bowman and his team of eight – including Ottawa natives Julian Orzel, Käthe Zahn and Andrew Robichaud – will see their film in theaters for the first time on March 12.

“Honestly, it’s going to be a whirlwind of emotions,” he said of the idea of ​​opening for Kubrick in Kubrick, a three-time international award-winning documentary feature. “It’s nerve-wracking. Will people pay attention? Will people think it’s just the short before the movie they bought tickets for?

“At the same time, for me and my peers to be able to go in there and see it and kind of block it all out and enjoy the seven-minute movie that we’ve created, it’s just going to be the best feeling ever, to be honest. ”

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The film – which is about one of the very first street performers in Toronto – has been selected as part of the Ottawa International Film Festival, which opens March 9-20 for in-person screenings for the premiere. times in the short history of the event. The ByTowne Cinema, the Ottawa Art Gallery and the Mayfair Theater will host screenings of the festival’s 26 internationally acclaimed feature films and 26 Canadian short films.

The first edition of the festival was supposed to take place in March 2020, but was canceled due to COVID-19. After screening the festival online for the 2021 season, IFFO is now turning on the spotlight for its first-ever in-person viewings.

“There is no substitute for having an audience sitting together in a theater and being able to discuss the film afterwards,” said Kelly Neall, Executive Director of IFFO. “We’ll try to keep it as open as possible so people can have a chance to meet filmmakers and talk to each other.”

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“We are thrilled to present IFFO 2022 as a primarily live event,” Tom McSorley, Executive Director of IFFO and the Canadian Film Institute, said in a press release. The festival will also present five films online for those from Ontario and Quebec.

McSorley said the festival “will adhere to public health and safety protocols.” For example, customers will be asked to provide a proof of vaccination QR code with government-issued photo ID at all venues before entering. There will also be mandatory masking when not eating or drinking, physical distancing and self-screening before arrival. Hand disinfection at planned stations will be available.

All of these measures will allow filmmakers to see their creations in person on the big screen for the first time in a long time – or in Bowman’s case, for the very first time. His film, which follows the artistic life and career of Toronto native Walter Ruston, entered seven festivals after being completed in May 2021. It won two awards for best documentary and best short film at the Canada Shorts festival.

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But all of these festivals were only screened online.

“You can’t show up, you can’t attend a panel, you can’t network or make your way to more festivals like most filmmakers,” Bowman said of film screening challenges. online only. “I didn’t think these opportunities would arise anymore.”

Luckily for the young filmmaker, IFFO’s programming team looked to festivals around the world to find candidates for this year’s event. “(It’s) the best kind of event of festivals,” Neall said.

IFFO is organized to allow an Ottawa audience to enjoy an international film festival in their own neighborhood, Neall said.

“We’re not really trying to compete with TIFF or any of the Montreal festivals. (We) just bring people downtown to enjoy a night out and watch a screening and create a really dynamic and interesting attraction for the city.

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Twenty-six of the feature films will be paired with a Canadian short film that will be screened beforehand. “It will be a good duality there. You get the punchy short and then the more esoteric feature,” Bowman said.

Tickets start at $15 for a single screening, $50 for five screenings, and $200 for a full festival package.

“We really hope people will come. We try to offer our screenings to a younger audience, but I think it will appeal to everyone,” Neall said.

IFFO will work closely with its partners in ByTowne, OAG and Mayfair to project the festival.

“We hope people will be as excited as we are about coming to a film festival,” Neall said.

For more information, visit iffo.ca.

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The Montreal filmmaker refused to give up on Woman in Car https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-montreal-filmmaker-refused-to-give-up-on-woman-in-car/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 01:39:10 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-montreal-filmmaker-refused-to-give-up-on-woman-in-car/ Breadcrumb Links News Montreal movies Local News Getting funding for an independent English film in Quebec has been the biggest challenge, Vanya Rose said. “We had given up and I was moving on,” Montreal filmmaker Vanya Rose said of her indie project Woman in Car. Photo by Pierre Obendrauf /Montreal Gazette Postmedia may earn an […]]]>

Getting funding for an independent English film in Quebec has been the biggest challenge, Vanya Rose said.

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Finding the funding to make films in Canada is a struggle at the best of times and it’s even more difficult to make films in English in Quebec. Ask Vanya Rose.

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She will be happy to tell you how difficult it is to get a feature film project in the language of Spielberg off the ground in la belle province.

According to the Montreal filmmaker, it’s a miracle that her first feature, Woman in Car, made it to the big screen. The intense drama about a woman on the brink of depression, which stars Hélène Joy of Murdoch Mysteries, opens at the Cinéma du Musée on February 25.

Rose — who wrote, directed and produced Woman in Car — had been turned down three times by SODEC. The provincial funding agency gave her feedback, so she was confident Round 4 would be a success. But that was not the case. They once again rejected the film and Rose thought that was the end of the project.

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“It’s so hard to shoot an English film in Quebec, let alone any film in Quebec,” Rose said in an interview. “It was almost impossible. (Funding agencies) mostly came in post-production and we had almost no money. It was almost impossible to get help. It’s a very difficult situation for Anglophones. We are a minority group here and there is (only) a certain amount of funding allocated to us. We therefore cannot exceed this amount. There must be a certain number of French films that are funded .

Next, Rose met local film insider Marie Potvin, whom she describes as “the unsung hero of Quebec cinema.” They had known each other since Rose was making short films and Potvin, who had worked at SODEC, had always been a supporter of the filmmaker. Rose considered retiring from acting altogether.

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Montreal filmmaker Vanya Rose looks in the rearview mirror of a car.  Her new feature Woman in Car is out this month.
Montreal filmmaker Vanya Rose looks in the rearview mirror of a car. Her new feature Woman in Car is out this month. Photo by Pierre Obendrauf /Montreal Gazette

Potvin asked what was going on with Woman in Car and said there had been arguments at SODEC over the merits of the project. Potvin said Rose should do the movie.

It was then that Rose decided to call Joy, who had worked with her on one of her shorts. She told the actress about the struggles she was having raising finance and Joy, who has a burgeoning acting career, said she would be happy to contribute some of her own money. Joy also connected Rose with Avi Federgreen, who is one of the go-to producers of Canadian independent films. He came on board as an executive producer, along with Joy.

“We had given up and I was moving on,” Rose said.

But even with funding in place, the project was on a tight budget, with Rose doing whatever needed to be done, often while caring for her then two-year-old son. (She has two sons, who are now 5 and 10.) She found places. She even found a Mercedes Benz for the shoot which she was able to use for free.

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Woman in Car centers on Anne, a wealthy widow who is about to marry David (Anthony Lemke). But dark secrets lurk in his past and this troubled history is rekindled when his stepson Owen (Aidan Ritchie) arrives on the scene with a mysterious Turkish woman, Safiye (Liane Balaban).

Much of the action takes place in what appears to be upper Westmount, a rarity for a Quebec film.

“I really wanted to showcase Montreal,” Rose said. “(English-speaking Quebec) has been so rarely represented in cinema. Of course, Montreal serves as a backdrop for American films, but we rarely say (when watching Quebec films): “Oh, people speak English in Montreal”. No one really shows this side of Montreal.

It was inspired by Edith Wharton’s novel The Reef, but Rose is quick to point out that the film has little to do with the 1912 novel.

“But what grabbed me (in the novel) at the end of the day was this idea of ​​the reef, something that you can’t get over,” Rose said. “Once a ship hits a reef, it can’t pass…and we have all those reefs. There are always these reefs: it can be a love, a career, just things that you can’t overcome.

bkelly@postmedia.com

twitter.com/brendanshowbiz

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Canucks’ Quinn Hughes to return from COVID-19 shark protocol https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/canucks-quinn-hughes-to-return-from-covid-19-shark-protocol/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 22:39:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/canucks-quinn-hughes-to-return-from-covid-19-shark-protocol/ Breadcrumb Links Sports NHL Hockey “Some people can’t take a day off. Some people can take maybe 16 days off and just be awesome because they’re awesome. I hope Quinn falls into that category.” – Bruce Boudreau on Hughes’ return Quinn Hughes should be at his elusive and playmaking best on Thursday in San Jose. […]]]>

“Some people can’t take a day off. Some people can take maybe 16 days off and just be awesome because they’re awesome. I hope Quinn falls into that category.” – Bruce Boudreau on Hughes’ return

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Under constant siege, an exit strategy for the exhausted Vancouver Canucks has been those big puck shots in the neutral zone.

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It’s not the most attractive, creative, or efficient way for a struggling offensive club to escape the forecheck and generate offense. It looked like a sign of surrender.

This has happened often in the last three games following Quinn Hughes in COVID-19 quarantine in the United States. It was a stark reminder of how the quick, quick-thinking, quick-passing defender can ease pressure with a quick pivot and then unleash that long tape-to-tape pass to leap forward.

That hadn’t happened since Feb. 1 in Nashville when he recorded 26:46 of ice time in a 4-2 win over the Predators.

Hughes is scheduled to play in San Jose on Thursday, and while worry is usual about any player trying to shake off the symptoms of the virus and find his game quickly, he is no ordinary player. He is constantly working at his craft to keep pushing the performance bar.

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Hughes skated and practiced and Bruce Boudreau wouldn’t be surprised if the 22-year-old wonderkid didn’t miss a beat against the Sharks.


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“Something tells me there are people in this world who can’t take a day off,” the Canucks coach said. “Some people can take maybe 16 days off and be awesome because they’re awesome. I hope Quinn is in that category.

It’s a good bet because Hughes gobbles down ice time like he’s at a buffet.

He recorded a career-high 31:07 on Jan. 29 in Calgary and has gone over 26 minutes in seven of his last eight outings. He is the club’s second-highest scorer with 34 points (2-32) and his plus-10 rating is a product of improved defensive play and better overall awareness. And his 17 power-play assists rank him fourth among his NHL peers.

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Sometimes you lose perspective because what Hughes does at night has become commonplace. It is when the opponent receives the full dose of the defender that the appreciation needle changes from impressed to amazed.

Matthew Highmore, who also returns Thursday from COVID, has good wheels. However, when he faced Hughes two years ago while with the Chicago Blackhawks and had to hunt the elusive defenseman, it was a real eye-opener.

After all, how do you keep a guy who can break your ankles with a quick turnaround from trouble that’s backed by sublime cutting edge work?

“I played him in this building (Rogers Arena) and I couldn’t believe his ability to get out of control to make an exit play out of the D-zone,” Highmore said Wednesday. “So I’m not necessarily surprised (now) because he continues to improve. He’s a key part of our defense corps and he’s really a special player.

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Oliver Ekman-Larsson had a points push in Hughes’ absence and also anchored the first unit on the power play. His five points (1-4) over the past three games is an opportunity with two power-play assists — he played 6:01 on the power pay Saturday against Toronto and finished with a season-high 25:31 — and get more shots from the point.

He’s had eight shots and a dozen more blocked or missed in that run, but knows what it will mean to get Hughes back.

“Great organization and an amazing player,” Ekman-Larsson said. “You appreciate him more when he’s on your team with the way he can move the puck and skate. It’s quite impressive.

“I didn’t expect him to be so good in the D zone and he works there every day and wants to be a good two-way defender. It struck me when I came here. He’s really good all over the ice and we need him to make plays. And he’s such a nice guy. I am happy to be on his team and to help him.

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As for that own game, Ekman-Larsson showed something with Hughes on the sidelines.

“I know I can still play with the puck,” he said. “I knew the situation with Quinn and I just did what the team needed me to – whether it was on the power play on the No. 1 unit or killing penalties – and it didn’t really matter. important to me.

“I know I’m a good player and I can still play with the puck, shoot and score. It was good to score points, but to be honest I don’t think I was playing that well when the points came. But it’s also nice to get on the board.

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As to where and what Hughes was doing in the United States, or allowed to do while in quarantine, was a mystery as his location was never disclosed by the Canucks. A good bet is that he wasn’t glued to a video game console, judging by past comments about his downtime.

“I left my Xbox at home (Michigan), so that’s how much I care about the game,” he once told this reporter. “I left it because I had forgotten about it and didn’t care because I didn’t use it at all in the summer. It’s just gathering dust down there.

Hughes loves going to the movies, so if it worked out with the protocols, he probably grabbed a movie or two.

bkuzma@postmedia.com

twitter.com/@benkuzma


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What the major Beijing Olympics aviation site has to say about China’s smog problem https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/what-the-major-beijing-olympics-aviation-site-has-to-say-about-chinas-smog-problem/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 03:34:10 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/what-the-major-beijing-olympics-aviation-site-has-to-say-about-chinas-smog-problem/ Breadcrumb Links Sports Olympic Games When Eileen Gu won gold, everyone wanted to know: what was a snowy ski ramp doing next to a multitude of gigantic ovens and cooling towers? Author of the article: Bloomberg News Bloomberg News The Big Air Shougang site at the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics was photographed on Tuesday. Photo […]]]>

When Eileen Gu won gold, everyone wanted to know: what was a snowy ski ramp doing next to a multitude of gigantic ovens and cooling towers?

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When Eileen Gu landed a perfect 1620 double left to win gold in the women’s freestyle big air at the Beijing Olympics, her performance drew attention to the unusual surroundings. What was a snowy ski ramp doing next to a multitude of ovens and gigantic cooling towers?

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No, the competition did not take place in a nuclear power plant. The venue is adjacent to a disused steel mill, once a source of national pride – and a major contributor to Beijing’s legendary smog. How a massive polluter became an Olympic site is also a story of China’s efforts to renovate cities and its struggles to tackle air pollution and reach net zero.

The furnaces and cooling towers behind the world’s first major permanent site emitted toxic smoke. Built for the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics, the ‘Shougang Big Air’ sits on the Capital Steel Campus in western Beijing, once one of China’s largest steelmaking centers.

The park’s transition began long before preparations for the Winter Olympics. Capital Steel, also known as Shougang, began relocating its operations from Beijing to neighboring Hebei province in 2005 as the government moved dozens of polluting factories out of the capital to ensure blue skies for workers. 2008 Summer Olympics. When Capital Steel moved, it took 18,000 tonnes of air pollutants a year with it, or about 20% of the hazardous particles that gave the city one of the worst grades in the world. air to the world.

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Olympic host cities are generally criticized for overbuilding, as well as the waste and carbon generated by hosting a mega international event. As part of its promise to host a green Winter Olympics, Beijing has relied on existing venues, including Shougang Park. After the Games, the platform will be retained as a permanent installation. The park now also hosts the office of the Winter Olympics Committee.

Built on the existing buildings at the site, “The ‘Big Air’ presents a perfect combination of urban industrial heritage and Olympic culture,” said Li Sen, an official with the Beijing Organizing Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. 2022 winter season. “The site is an example of sustainable development.

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China's Eileen Gu celebrates winning gold in the women's big air event at the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics on Tuesday.
China’s Eileen Gu celebrates winning gold in the women’s big air event at the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics on Tuesday. Photo by Gavin Young /Postmedia

When not in use for the Olympics, Shougang Park is an 860-hectare tourist attraction with chic cafes and bookstores nestled among old tubes and ladders. The industrial vibe has made it a popular backdrop for social media sharing. C40, a non-profit climate network, has identified Shougang Park as a “climate positive development program” – the only case in China.

Capital Steel’s decision was more mixed for its new neighbors. Tangshan in Hebei Province has seen an influx of jobs with the installation of all the polluting factories and is now the largest steel center in the world. He also inherited Beijing’s air pollution. While the capital is no longer among the 20 most polluted cities in China, Tangshan makes the list every year.

©2022 Bloomberg LP

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The demographic weight of Quebec within Canada continues to erode, according to the census https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-demographic-weight-of-quebec-within-canada-continues-to-erode-according-to-the-census/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 18:05:35 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-demographic-weight-of-quebec-within-canada-continues-to-erode-according-to-the-census/ Breadcrumb Links Local News Quebec was home to 23% of Canadians in 2021, down from 23.2% in 2016, even though the population grew by 4.1% during this period. Author of the article: The Canadian Press Clara Descurninges The sun sets behind the Montreal skyline in 2021. Photo by Allen McInnis /Montreal Gazette Content of the […]]]>

Quebec was home to 23% of Canadians in 2021, down from 23.2% in 2016, even though the population grew by 4.1% during this period.

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Figures compiled as part of the 2021 census show that Quebec’s share of the Canadian population has declined for the 11th consecutive census period.

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Quebec was home to 23% of Canadians in 2021, up from 23.2% in 2016, despite the province’s population growing by 4.1% between 2016 and 2021. And while this latest provincial increase outpaced the jump of 3.3% during the previous census period, it remained below the national average population increase of 5.2%.

The Montreal region saw its population increase by 4.6% between 2016 and 2021 compared to 4.2% during the previous census period. But if the last year of the census period is considered in isolation, the population of the Montreal area fell by 0.06% between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2021, a drop attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent movement to other regions by those who can telecommute.

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The population of downtown Montreal has increased by 24.2% between 2016 and 2021. Downtown Halifax is the only area that has recorded similar growth. Downtown Montreal is the third most densely populated in the country after Vancouver and Toronto.

But again, the pandemic was felt in 2020-2021, with downtown seeing a 3.1% year-over-year population decline.

“Since the onset of the pandemic, the allure of city center living may have lost some of its charm, as many working from home have fewer opportunities to participate in cultural activities. or recreational,” writes Statistics Canada, noting that in April 2020, “about 40% of workers spent most of their working hours at home,” up from 4% in 2016.

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Meanwhile, suburbs located more than 30 minutes from downtown Montreal saw their population jump by 7%, a much higher rate than other parts of the city or suburbs closer to downtown.

“There is really a phenomenon of urban sprawl” which coincides with “a densification of city centers”, declared Wednesday Laurent Martel, who supervises the analysis of demographic data compiled by the census, during a press conference. Virtual.

The demographer said that towns outside major centers benefit from population displacement and that a town like St-Jean-sur-Richelieu could soon be considered a major center itself.

Highlights of the census for Quebec:

Population 2021: 8,501,833

Population 2016: 8,164,361

Percentage change in population: 4.1

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Total number of private dwellings: 4,050,164

Private dwellings occupied by usual residents: 3,749,035

Population density per square kilometer: 6.5

Area in square kilometers: 1,298,599.75

Communities that have grown the most: St. Apollinaire, 30.4%; Bromont, 25.6%; Carignan, 24.1%; St-Zotique, 21.2%; Mirabel, 21 percent.

Communities that grew the least: Ste-Anne-des-Monts, minus-4.9%; Port-Cartier, minus-4.2%; Baie-Comeau, minus-3.9%; Kirkland, minus 3.7%; Chibougamau, minus-3.6%

This story was produced with financial assistance from Facebook and the Canadian Press News Fellowship.

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Denis Villeneuve’s Dune earns 10 Oscar nominations, including Best Adapted Screenplay https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/denis-villeneuves-dune-earns-10-oscar-nominations-including-best-adapted-screenplay/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:50:20 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/denis-villeneuves-dune-earns-10-oscar-nominations-including-best-adapted-screenplay/ Breadcrumb Links News Local News The Power of the Dog, produced by Montrealer Roger Frappier, leads all films with 12 Oscar nominations. Benedict Cumberbatch and Jesse Plemons in The Power of the Dog, co-produced by Montrealer Roger Frappier. Photo by Kirsty Griffin /netflix Content of the article Roger Frappier has been making movies since 1971 […]]]>

The Power of the Dog, produced by Montrealer Roger Frappier, leads all films with 12 Oscar nominations.

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Roger Frappier has been making movies since 1971 and has produced some of the most famous Quebec films. Critical and commercial successes such as The Decline of the American Empire, Jesus of Montreal and The Great Seduction.

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But it’s fair to say that the 76-year-old Montrealer had never experienced a morning like Tuesday. He was in Los Angeles with his girlfriend and family members when he learned that his latest film, The Power of the Dog, had been nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars. Even better, the film, written and directed by acclaimed New Zealand filmmaker Jane Campion, was the main Oscar nominee, with 12 nominations. They included nominations in three of the four acting categories. Benedict Cumberbatch is nominated for Best Actor, Jesse Plemons for Best Supporting Actor and Kirsten Dunst for Best Supporting Actress.

The two main nominees for the 2022 Oscars both have strong ties to Montreal. Dune is the second most nominated film with 10 nominations and it is directed and co-written by Montrealer Denis Villeneuve.

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Villeneuve was not nominated for Best Director but made the shortlist for Best-Adapted Screenplay alongside co-writers Jon Spaihts and Eric Roth. Dune is also in the running for best picture. Dune is Villeneuve’s adaptation of the classic 1965 science fiction novel by Frank Hébert.

The Oscars will take place on March 27.

“It’s overwhelming,” Frappier said, by phone Tuesday morning from Los Angeles. “I’ve watched the Oscars all my life and never thought I’d be in the top picture category with such a fantastic film. It’s a beautiful day. Jane not only kept the essence of this great book by Thomas Savage but she put her own take on this story The power of the dog is 10 years of my life.

The Power of the Dog is a beautifully shot and amazingly acted harrowing drama about two brothers in the ranching business in Montana in the 1920s. It’s a slow gothic western, a drama about sexuality and, most surprisingly , a story of murder.

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Frappier read the 1967 novel 10 years ago and immediately fell in love with it. But at the time, the rights were not available. Frappier kept in touch with the publisher at the publishing house, having lunch with her whenever he was in New York and 18 months later she called to say the rights were available.

He got them back but was still struggling to develop the project. He tried Sony. It did not work. He tried Amazon. Same thing.

Then came the call that changed his life.

“Three years ago, two weeks before the Cannes Film Festival, I received a phone call to my office in Montreal from a woman with a strange accent, saying, ‘Hi, I’m Jane Campion’s agent, I would like to know if the rights to The Power of the Dog are available.’ I almost fell out of my chair.”

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Frappier met Campion – whose films include An Angel at My Table, The Piano and The Portrait of a Woman – at the Carlton Hotel in Cannes and things immediately clicked between them. It turned out that the two were going to be in Rome a week after Cannes.

“We spent a week in Rome, every morning in the same little cafe, each with a copy of the book, discussing the characters and all that,” Frappier says. “It was amazing. There had been so many difficulties bringing it to the screen and suddenly it seemed not only possible but in the hands of the right person.

At the end of that week in Rome, Frappier told Campion the project was hers if she wanted it.

The film is already a big success. It had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival, where Campion won the Silver Lion for Best Director. It had a limited theatrical release due to the pandemic, then premiered on Netflix on December 1 where it did extremely well in many countries, according to Frappier. He recently won three Golden Globe Awards, for Best Drama, Supporting Actor (Kodi Smit-McPhee) and Best Director.

“Even though it’s a period piece, I feel like it speaks to our contemporary situation,” Frappier said. “A man who thinks he’s so tough but at the same time he keeps all his feelings inside of him. And Jane understood the complexity of every character. It’s not black and white. It’s very complex And I think that’s what makes this movie so great.

bkelly@postmedia.com

twitter.com/brendanshowbiz

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

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Neighborhood ice rink a pandemic blessing for Beaconsfield families https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/neighborhood-ice-rink-a-pandemic-blessing-for-beaconsfield-families/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 12:38:25 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/neighborhood-ice-rink-a-pandemic-blessing-for-beaconsfield-families/ Breadcrumb Links West Island Gazette News Local News Life Health Adopt-a-Rink has brought the neighborhood together at a time when young families are struggling to find balance in their lives. Author of the article: John Meagher • Montreal Gazette Publication date : February 03, 2022 • 27 minutes ago • 4 minute read • Join […]]]>

Adopt-a-Rink has brought the neighborhood together at a time when young families are struggling to find balance in their lives.

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When François Sébastien first built a modest outdoor skating rink in a Beaconsfield park a decade ago, he had no idea how important his contribution to community life would become for his neighbors.

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As the deadly COVID-19 pandemic reaches its grim two-year mark, Sébastien’s ice rink has become more than a cool place where kids can play outside without masks; it has become a focal point for families seeking fresh air and respite from feeling confined within the four walls of their homes.

What started as a labor of love for Sebastien has turned into a popular spot for West Island parents who drive from far and wide to Jasper Park so their kids can enjoy one joys of the Canadian winter despite freezing temperatures.

His frozen dream field is being built with the help of neighbors and the city as part of Beaconsfield’s Adopt-a-Rink program, a volunteer-led rink-making initiative that allows local citizens to borrow water. ice-making equipment (i.e. shovels and rubber hose) from the city’s public works department to freeze a slab of ice in one of the city’s smaller parks. There are no boards, and those who prefer traditional shinny hockey are directed to one of the city’s seven outdoor rinks manned by chalet attendants.

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Jasper’s rink is about 35 by 85 feet, but the attraction for many is a skating rink adjacent to the “lazy river” that meanders through the park’s playground equipment.

Sébastien thanks his wife Natalie for designing this year’s course. “I try to do something a little different every year,” he said.

Sébastien usually maintains the ice himself with the help of parents and neighborhood children who are happy to lend a hand. He bought a used snowblower seven years ago and doesn’t regret it.

Although the town’s snow plow passes after a heavy snowfall, Sebastien is usually ahead of them. “It’s rough, but they’ll come if it snows more than three inches, once they’ve cleaned their ice (at the outdoor hockey rink near Briarwood Park) they’ll come and do ours.”

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Sébastien usually starts making ice cream in December, weather permitting. “When you start it, you have to water as much as you can. Sometimes it’s four times a day if it’s cold enough. Now, because the winter has been very cold, I barely water it. It’s just a matter of maintenance, no more shoveling and cleaning.

Sébastien is the last citizen to carry the torch of the Jasper skating rink. The park’s first ice master was Beaconsfield resident John Kelly, nicknamed the “Lord of the Rink” by neighbors. It was also the subject of a memorable ‘rink making’ painting by renowned West Island artist John Starkey.

Like Kelly before him, Sébastien draws his inspiration from seeing his neighbors come together, especially in these difficult times.

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“It’s therapy for a lot of things,” said Sébastien. “There are definitely more people using the rink now. Last year was crazy and this year it’s not as crazy but people still come a lot, more than previous years.

His own children — Daphne (15), Guillaume (13) and Edgar (11) — also regularly attend the rink.

Edgar loves that the rink is “so close” to his home. He meets friends there after school and admits there wouldn’t be much to do without her. “I was watching TV or doing my homework,” he says.

Sébastien said the rink has brought the neighborhood together at a time when some young families are struggling to find balance in their lives.

“It’s mainly the fact that we see neighbors that we wouldn’t see much or at all during the winter. The people we see in the summer, we continue to see them in the winter.

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Neighbor Sezen Eren is impressed with Sebastian’s dedication. “He does a really good job,” said Eren, father of 10-year-old twins – Alya and Kaan – who are among regulars who flock to the rink after school and on weekends.

Eren says the rink has provided a wonderful recreational and social outlet for the twins who are grade 5 students at Beaconsfield Elementary School.

Francesco Donatelli lives opposite the park. His daughters — Caterina and Guilia — have improved their skating on the rink. The girls are grateful to have a rink they can almost call their own.

Although the rink is not intended for hockey, occasional games are held with youth and adults. There are no hockey nets, so chunks of snow often suffice as makeshift goal posts.

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“It’s one of the great assets of this ice rink”, explains Sébastien. “Everyone plays hockey and everyone skates. It’s for all ages and there is no competition. When we play hockey, we don’t count the score, we just play. That’s what’s really fun about it.

Like all those who have grown tired of life during the pandemic, Sébastien prays that the worst is behind us.

“Hopefully, praise the Lord,” he said, laughing. “It looks like we should get through this. But you never know.”

jmeagher@postmedia.com

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