committed maintaining – WPFG Montreal 2017 http://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 15:07:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg committed maintaining – WPFG Montreal 2017 http://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ 32 32 Brownstein: Scholarship fund honors Montreal music store manager https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/brownstein-scholarship-fund-honors-montreal-music-store-manager/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 21:02:13 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/brownstein-scholarship-fund-honors-montreal-music-store-manager/ Breadcrumb Links Opinion Music Local News Columnists The Sheldon Sazant Memorial Fund will allow high school and CEGEP students to take evening and weekend music lessons at Vanier College. “The idea here is to make music accessible to everyone, not just the elite,” said Alena Perout of Vanier College’s School of Music, which is slated […]]]>

The Sheldon Sazant Memorial Fund will allow high school and CEGEP students to take evening and weekend music lessons at Vanier College.

Content of the article

Sunday marks the second anniversary of the death of Steve’s Music Store manager Sheldon Sazant, who succumbed to cancer at the age of 60. His loss was and still is felt by his family, friends and so many others in the Montreal music community.

Advertising

Content of the article

Among those whose lives he touched was the family of Alena Perout, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, Commerce, Arts and Letters and Music at Vanier College. Perout, her husband and their son were longtime clients and later friends of Sazant, who graduated from Vanier College.

After Sazant’s death, Perout felt that something had to be done to carry on his legacy. She has since become the driving force behind the new Sheldon Sazant Memorial Fund to benefit young student musicians.

The fund will provide scholarships, grants and instruments to students at Vanier College and local high schools who attend the Vanier College School of Music, which is slated to open in the fall and which was also directed by Perout.

Advertising

Content of the article

“Our whole family loved the music and frequently stopped by Steve’s, where our son, then a young guitarist, tried out new instruments and gear,” Perout said. “Sheldon was so helpful and encouraging, and we developed a great relationship as a result.”

So much so that when Perout’s husband landed tickets to The Who, one of their and Sazant’s favorites, the couple invited him and his wife, Della Druick, to join them at the concert. Toronto.

“We had an amazing time together, although he mentioned he had a bad back then and thought he had shot something,” Perout recalled of the October 2019 show. “We found out a month later that the pains were due to cancer, and a few months later he died. It is ultimately the last concert he attends.

Advertising

Content of the article

“His death hit everyone who knew him so hard. He was always there to help people, professional musicians and amateurs alike. If a band or musician needed something at the last minute, he would always take care of it. He was such a presence in our lives and the lives of so many others.

One of Perout’s main motivations for the memorial fund and music school was to provide students facing reduced music schedules the opportunity to attend after-school and weekend classes in Vanier. .

“With the reduced music programming due to limited funds in public schools, it’s really created a big gap as a lot of potentially talented young musicians are lost in the community,” Perout said. “Vanier College therefore decided to meet this need by opening a music school outside of school hours so that students could learn about music while still young. Our goal is to make the cost as reasonable as possible to ensure access for anyone interested.

Advertising

Content of the article

To this end, students enrolled in the Vanier School of Music will have access to scholarships offered by the Sazant Memorial Fund. Bursaries can be used to subsidize the cost of lessons and the rental or purchase of instruments. The school will initially offer guitar, piano and voice lessons, and the plan is to expand its offerings eventually.

“We’re starting small, but the hope is that we really grow,” Perout said. “The idea here is to make music accessible to everyone, not just the elite. This can greatly contribute to a person’s well-being.

Druick, Sazant’s widow, agrees and believes the memorial fund will serve as an excellent tribute to her husband.

“I’m so touched that Alena graciously thought of this memorial fund in Sheldon’s name,” said Druick, also a Vanier graduate. “What a great way to honor his name, not to mention how lucky these kids will be to have a place to learn, play and enjoy music. It would have made Sheldon very happy. Sheldon has always believed that music should be accessible to everyone. He repeated it constantly. »

Advertising

Content of the article

Druick noted how Sazant, who was a staple of Steve’s for 40 years, would often come to the rescue of musicians who had equipment stolen or lost right before a performance. He would also help budding amateurs by lending them equipment they could use for practice.

“Even those who couldn’t afford it, he told them to take guitars and pay when they could. And he always got paid,” she said. “But his real gift was to treat ordinary people like rock stars and rock stars like ordinary people.”

For more information on the Sheldon Sazant Memorial Fund and the Vanier College School of Music, email musicschool@vaniercollege.qc.ca.

bbrownstein@postmedia.com

twitter.com/billbrownstein

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. See our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

]]>
Bye Bye 2021 was the highest rated show in Quebec television history https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/bye-bye-2021-was-the-highest-rated-show-in-quebec-television-history/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 00:56:23 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/bye-bye-2021-was-the-highest-rated-show-in-quebec-television-history/ Breadcrumb Links News Local News Radio-Canada’s satirical comedy show was watched by 4.862 million people, helped in part by a 10 p.m. curfew in the province. The actress Guylaine Tremblay embodies the host Guillaume Lemay-Thivierge of the TVA program Chanteurs Masqués, as part of the Bye Bye program on Radio-Canada. Photo courtesy of Radio-Canada. Content […]]]>

Radio-Canada’s satirical comedy show was watched by 4.862 million people, helped in part by a 10 p.m. curfew in the province.

Content of the article

Even Simon Olivier Fecteau, the creative driving force behind Bye Bye, admits that the ratings for the satirical New Year’s comedy show are a bit wild.

Advertising

Content of the article

“This year, the numbers have exploded,” Fecteau said in a telephone interview Wednesday afternoon. “It’s almost five million people. It’s a bit crazy for a province of eight million people.

It’s even more impressive considering that a large portion of the province’s English speakers aren’t watching. In other words, almost all Francophones in the province were glued to their televisions watching the same television program. It’s something that just doesn’t happen these days. For example, last year’s Super Bowl, the biggest television event of the year in the United States, was watched by 38% of households there.

Fecteau reported that Bye Bye’s market share among French-speaking viewers was 91 percent.

“It’s kind of crazy,” said Fecteau, who is the show’s content producer, co-director and one of the writers. “I don’t think people realize how special it is. Bye Bye has been around for over 50 years and it’s one of those traditions that’s more important than you might think. It’s only here in Quebec, it’s nowhere else in the world. I think the only other place in the world where you would get those numbers would be in North Korea. If you don’t watch TV, you get shot. It’s crazy. So I’m very happy to be part of it. »

Advertising

Content of the article

Bye Bye 2021 was watched by 4.862 million people, compared to 4.662 million for the previous year’s edition of the comedy show.

These figures come from audience measurement company Numeris and include people who watched a recording after the original broadcast.

Indeed, four of the five highest-rated programs in the history of Quebec television are Bye Bye editions. The other three shows in the all-time top five are Bye Bye 2018 (4.41 million), Bye Bye 2019 (4.371 million) and an episode of the slapstick comedy series La petite vie in 1995 (4.098 million).

It is also the highest ratings in the history of Infoman, another satirical comedy show that aired just before Bye Bye on Radio-Canada. The show, which stars comedian Jean-René Dufort, drew 3.629 million viewers, up from 3.467 million viewers a year earlier.

Advertising

Content of the article

This year’s edition of Bye Bye, broadcast on Radio-Canada, has, as usual, usurped many of the most talked about events and personalities in Quebec over the past year. Denis Coderre, Justin Trudeau, TV host Guillaume Lemay-Thivierge and power couple Véronique Cloutier and Louis Morissette, among others, have been skewered. One of the most memorable sketches, The Woking Dead, shows a band of awakened militants invading Prime Minister François Legault’s house, only to be killed when Legault’s wife, Isabelle Brais, begins reading a chronicle of the right-wing pundit Richard Martineau.

Even fired Canadiens general manager Marc Bergevin made an appearance, in a parody of those Mario Tremblay/Patrick Roy Uber Eats commercials. The real Bergevin (not an actor who plays him) is shown eating an “unemployed pudding” because he was unemployed at the time (this was before he was hired as a senior adviser with the Kings of Los Angeles). He also refuses a “Molsonne” beer.

Advertising

Content of the article

Some of the province’s best comedians and comedians appeared in the show, including Sarah-Jeanne Labrosse, Mehdi Bousaidan, Guylaine Tremblay and François Bellefeuille.

Of course, the ratings were helped by the fact that Legault imposed another curfew, which began on New Year’s Eve and forced people to stay home from 10 p.m.

“Of course the pandemic has given us a boost, I’m not stupid,” Fecteau said. “The fact that people can’t legally leave their homes, of course that helps. But they could have done something else. They could have been watching movies or just being with family. On the 31st, I made a tweet which I deleted. After a few minutes, I thought it was going to go wrong. I tweeted to Francois Legault — “thank you for accepting our offer and we’ll refund you.” It was as if we were in cahoots with the government. But I took it down because I was pretty sure some people wouldn’t get the joke.

Advertising

Content of the article

Dany Meloul, general manager of Radio-Canada Television, pointed out that Bye Bye has been a key part of French-speaking Canadians’ New Year celebrations since the 1960s. And it’s a tradition that is perhaps even more important now, said he added.

“I think it was very reassuring for people to realize that everyone was watching the same show in their living room all over Quebec,” Meloul said. “In the middle of the pandemic, people needed it.”

bkelly@postmedia.com

twitter.com/brendanshowbiz

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

]]>
My year: the musical director of Montreal does not regret having moved https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/my-year-the-musical-director-of-montreal-does-not-regret-having-moved/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 11:04:06 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/my-year-the-musical-director-of-montreal-does-not-regret-having-moved/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links News Local news When the pandemic struck, Fannie Crepin traded her loft in Villeray for a house in the woods – and she doesn’t miss the city. Author of the article: Brendan Kelly • Montreal Gazette Release date : Dec 31 2021 • 4 days ago • 3 minutes to read • […]]]>


[ad_1]

When the pandemic struck, Fannie Crepin traded her loft in Villeray for a house in the woods – and she doesn’t miss the city.

Content of the article

My Year is a weeklong series in which Montrealers from all walks of life tell Brendan Kelly how they lived through the remarkable year 2021. Today: Fannie Crepin, Music Director.

Advertising

Content of the article

When the first wave of the pandemic took Quebec by storm in the spring of 2020, Fannie Crepin felt it was time for a major change in her life.

Crepin runs a music artist management company called Supercool Management, and his office has been set up in his loft in Villeray.

“As soon as it hit, I was talking to a few friends around the world and reading a lot, and just had a feeling it was going to take forever,” Crepin said. “At that time, people were thinking about reopening in September. Like four months later. I just had the feeling that I couldn’t live in this contagious (environment), with this lack of space, with the lack of green spaces. I did not have a terrace. I just felt super trapped in the city. So I started looking for land. I didn’t have a lot of money and was afraid of where we were going in the future.

Advertising

Content of the article

She would go up north every weekend and look for places, walking the Red River because she knew that was where she wanted to live. She did this for four months, then her mother found a house in Kijiji with 14 acres of land and the river just on the edge of the woods. It cost $ 175,000. Crépin bought it in August 2020 and moved in in November.

At first, she continued to rent a small apartment in the city, on the Plateau, but after a few months, Crépin realized that she did not need a pied-à-terre in the city. She had fiber optic installed in her country house so that she could do all of her online work from there. In the summer, she went to town once a week for her regular softball game and slept at a friend’s house.

Advertising

Content of the article

But she doesn’t want to spend more time in the city.

“It’s when I come back to town that I realize the post-traumatic stress that city dwellers have compared to people in the regions,” says Crépin. “It’s really very different with COVID. The fear is not the same. At first I brought this fear of the city here. But we don’t see many people here. You don’t go out a lot.

Crépin also believes that she made a good financial decision.

“I feel more secure financially because I now have assets that I couldn’t afford in the city,” she said. “It’s cheaper to live here, and I have more means of sustenance. It was much more relaxing for the cost of living. It slowed down my pace of life, which I sometimes miss. But no one is really doing anything right now (in the city). If everything were as it was before the pandemic, I might miss the city more. But every time I go back, it’s not the city that I recognize. So I really don’t miss it at the moment. And my house has already risen in value since I bought it. It was therefore an excellent initiative. “

Advertising

Content of the article

She has goats and chickens on her property and loves living a completely different lifestyle.

“I don’t have to be in town anymore at my age,” said Crepin, who is 41. “It’s like my PR was done. I know these people now. I don’t have to stay and go to every event. If I was 24 or 25, I probably wouldn’t feel like that in terms of career. I just feel like if I go once a month, that’s enough to keep the contacts alive.

In short, she does not regret anything.

“It’s a great thing to leave a lot of friends, I’ve had a very social life,” Crépin said. “I worked in bars for many, many years. It’s a weird feeling at first (being in the country). But COVID has helped with that feeling. Everyone was locked up so it was just like a better shot. I don’t think it would have been so easy if life had continued normally in the city.

“It’s just the best decision I’ve ever made.”

bkelly@postmedia.com

twitter.com/brendanshowbiz

  1. My year: the Montreal hair salon is slowly coming back after confinement

  2. My Year: A Concordia Student Faced Many Challenges During The Pandemic

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a vibrant but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Check out our community guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.


[ad_2]

]]>
JONES: Elks CEO seeks up Ted Goveia, Chris Jones https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/jones-elks-ceo-seeks-up-ted-goveia-chris-jones/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 23:58:11 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/jones-elks-ceo-seeks-up-ted-goveia-chris-jones/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links Soccer Edmonton Elks LCF Author of the article: Terry jones Chris Jones is one of the nominees for the new general manager of the Edmonton Elks. Photo of Troy Fleece /Post-media network Content of the article You couldn’t have a soccer playoff involving two more devilishly different entities than this one. Advertising […]]]>


[ad_1]

Content of the article

You couldn’t have a soccer playoff involving two more devilishly different entities than this one.

Advertising

Content of the article

Ted Goveia and Chris Jones both arrived in Edmonton on Sunday for the final as general manager of the Edmonton Elks.

The idea here was for consultant Wally Buono to conduct the candidate search and produce a list of three to EE Chairman Ian Murray and Trustees Tom Richards and Darryl Boessenkool to make the final selection.

There are so many more implications than if it had turned out to be a simple showdown between the two Gray Cup assistant general managers, Goveia of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers and Shawn Burke of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. But on Sunday, Burke was announced as the new general manager of the Ottawa Redblacks.

It made Goveia against Jones.

Goveia has won the last two Gray Cups as assistant general manager and director of player personnel in Winnipeg.

Advertising

Content of the article

Since joining the Bombers in 2013 after four seasons with the Toronto Argos, Goveia has reportedly been heavily involved in all aspects of the formation of the scouting department, including Canadian and US negotiations, independent agencies and contracts. .

Certainly a low-key hire, Goveia is a Canadian who coached Canadian college football for 15 years.

Ted Goveia is one of the nominees for the new general manager of the Edmonton Elks.
Ted Goveia is one of the nominees for the new general manager of the Edmonton Elks. Photo by Ted Wyman /Post-media network

Jones, of course, is definitely a top coach and the most recent coach to win the Gray Cup in Edmonton in 2015.

Let’s go back to the day when EE last hired Jones as head coach and defensive coordinator.

He had just spent the previous two seasons with the Toronto Argonauts and was the defense architect who helped win the Gray Cup 100 in Toronto in 2012, when he was also assistant head coach and assistant general manager of the Argos. Jones replaced Kavis Reed, who was fired after Edmonton finished with a 4-14 record.

Advertising

Content of the article

Jones joined Montreal in 2002 and served as the Alouettes’ defensive coordinator until 2007, when he joined the Calgary Stampeders as a defensive coordinator. It was not without controversy that Jones joined the Argos. Toronto was fined $ 5,000 for tampering.

But what happened next in Edmonton makes it somewhat surprising that Jones will ever see this day, but potentially be hired to return. Within days, Jones left Edmonton to take up a position in Saskatchewan as General Manager, Head of Football Operations, Head Coach and Defensive Coordinator.

Not only did he leave Edmonton dry, Jones brought most of his coaching staff and a significant number of Gray Cup champion players with him.

In early January 2019, a week after signing a contract extension with the Roughriders, Jones resigned as he did a week after winning the Cup here.

Advertising

Content of the article

He left the Riders to become a senior defensive specialist with the Cleveland Browns of the NFL. He was taken off the coaching staff after one season.

Last season Jones found himself in Toronto as an assistant while Edmonton had a 3-11 season and lost all seven of their home games.

Talk about what’s going on around you.

It’s an interesting move with Jones, as half the fans probably want him to come back because he’s undeniably a proven winner. But the other half are probably not interested in forgiving him because of his departure in 2015.

There is also another factor.

Over the past two years, the image of the organization and its relationship with the community have suffered significant damage. Jones will long be remembered as the head coach who refused to let his players carry on their wonderful Monday Morning Magic tradition, helping children with special needs on the rides halfway through and sharing the morning with them. Jones refused to change the team’s training time to accommodate them.

Advertising

Content of the article

And here’s a thought that was expressed to me by an insider of the CFL. If EE chooses Jones, his other major vacancy, that of President and CEO, would instantly become less desirable. Jones is said to have tremendous power and leverage.

The idea to blow this thing up and fire CEO Chris Presson, GM Brock Sunderland and coach Jaime Elizondo was to try and win back fans who left Commonwealth Stadium almost entirely at the end of the season in the same time that nearly 100,000 of them filled the place for two World Cup qualifying matches.

Winning, of course, sells tickets. But by hiring Jones, how many additional subscription holders would you be chasing?

But there is another factor involved here. The Elks have a major problem in not having enough money for the football operations they have to work with, thanks to the salaries they have to pay to the people they have made redundant.

The big attraction of Jones, aside from his history of success, is that he would most likely be the general manager, head coach and defensive coordinator, and possibly for a lot less than what Saskatchewan paid him. . Goveia would just be the general manager.

However, if they hired Goveia, he would bring in a team of coaches who would be fully engaged in the community.

Who would you hire?

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a vibrant but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Visit our Community rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

[ad_2]

]]>
Chez Cora president says he was kidnapped after trying to help stranger https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/chez-cora-president-says-he-was-kidnapped-after-trying-to-help-stranger/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 22:52:30 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/chez-cora-president-says-he-was-kidnapped-after-trying-to-help-stranger/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links New Local News “I live in a dead end, it is not uncommon for people to show up lost”, testifies Nicholas Tsouflidis at the trial in Laval of Paul Zaidan. Author of the article: Paul Cherry • Montreal Gazette Paul Zaidan, who faces kidnapping and extortion charges, leaves an interview room at […]]]>


[ad_1]

“I live in a dead end, it is not uncommon for people to show up lost”, testifies Nicholas Tsouflidis at the trial in Laval of Paul Zaidan.

Content of the article

The night of March 8, 2017 was unlike any other in Nicholas Tsouflidis until someone knocked on his back door asking for help.

Advertising

Content of the article

The president of the restaurant chain Chez Cora told a jury at the Laval courthouse on Tuesday that he had decided to help the stranger before he had the surprise of his life.

Tsouflidis was the first witness called to testify in the trial of Paul Zaidan, 52, who is accused of kidnapping Tsouflidis, of detaining him against his will for hours and of attempting to extort 11 million dollars. dollars to Tsouflidis’ mother, Cora Tsouflidis, the founder of the channel. restaurant.

The trial, chaired by Superior Court judge François Dadour, began with an official reading of the charges. Zaidan pleaded not guilty to all three counts.

“I live in a dead end (in Mirabel) and it is not uncommon for people to show up lost, looking for another house in the street,” Tsouflidis told the jury.

Advertising

Content of the article

He said he was only wearing a shirt and underpants at the time and asked the stranger to wait while he changed.

Tsouflidis said he put on a pair of jeans and grabbed his cell phone before going out to help the man. Once outside, he said, the man claimed he had lost his keys on the ground and asked for help finding them. But as he approached the stranger, he pulled out a handgun.

“He said, ‘Get down on the ground,’” Tsouflidis recalls. “He was holding a 9mm pistol – something you see in the movies.”

Tsouflidis said that as he obeyed the man’s orders and lay on his stomach, he noticed two other men exiting the stranger’s vehicle.

One of the men tied his hands, Tsouflidis said, and he was placed in the trunk of the vehicle.

Advertising

Content of the article

Locked in the trunk, he managed to call 911 and gave the operator his address and a description of the vehicle. But one of his captors heard him speak, opened the truck and asked, “Who are you talking to?”

Tsouflidis said the kidnapper appeared not to realize he had a cell phone in his pants and closed the trunk once more. When a 911 operator called back, Tsouflidis was able to answer.

A 911 recording was played for the jury. The call sounded muffled and the operator said she was having trouble hearing it.

The witness said he was taken to a house where he could hear the sound of a garage door opening. He told the jury that he was ordered to descend stairs to what was an unfinished basement. Someone placed what appeared to be a pair of toy handcuffs on her and tied her legs with chains, he said.

Advertising

Content of the article

At one point, someone searched him and found his cell phone.

“You had a cell phone with you,” Tsouflidis said, citing the man’s reaction. “I told them, ‘You are not the brightest. I called 911. ‘ They started to panic.

“When they realized I had called 911, they were less aggressive. They weren’t nicer, but they were less aggressive.

At one point in his testimony, Tsouflidis said he believed up to five different men were involved in his kidnapping. He also said that when he realized the men wanted to extort a ransom from his money, he tried to convince them that they were wasting their time because the police knew he had been kidnapped.

Tsouflidis was found the next afternoon in a ditch by a passer-by.

Towards the end of her testimony, prosecutor Sarah Beaudry Leclerc asked Tsouflidis if he knew Zaidan before his kidnapping. The witness testified that Zaidan owned a Chez Cora franchise in Nuns’ Island for only “five or six months” before she ran into trouble.

“Franchising a restaurant, to use an analogy, is like having a license to drive a car,” he said. “When you have a license you have rules to follow – the rules of the road – and the way you drive can cause you to lose your license. A franchise works the same way.

“Unfortunately, we have withdrawn the banner, the right to use the name Chez Cora because, unfortunately, the restaurant was at fault.”

Tsouflidis will be cross-examined by the defense on Wednesday.

pcherry@postmedia.com

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Check out our community guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

[ad_2]

]]>
Montrealer’s Diwali book for children lights up the Hindu festival https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montrealers-diwali-book-for-children-lights-up-the-hindu-festival/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montrealers-diwali-book-for-children-lights-up-the-hindu-festival/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 10:03:49 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montrealers-diwali-book-for-children-lights-up-the-hindu-festival/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links Local arts Entertainment Books Mitali Banerjee Ruths advocates for intercultural respect and inclusiveness in Archie Celebrates Diwali. Author of the article: Ian mcgillis Release date : 04 November 2021 • 27 minutes ago • 4 minutes to read • Join the conversation Archie celebrates Diwali has its seeds in the childhood of […]]]>


[ad_1]

Mitali Banerjee Ruths advocates for intercultural respect and inclusiveness in Archie Celebrates Diwali.

Content of the article

Diwali, the festival of lights, is one of the most popular events in the world. Encompassing most of India and the South Asian diaspora, its celebrants number around one billion.

Advertising

Content of the article

A five-day multi-part Hindu religious event that is also observed in subtle variations by Sikhs, Jains and some Buddhists, the dates of Diwali change each year with the lunar calendar: it began this year on Tuesday and on the day. main is Thursday. It has many roots, starting with the ancient story of Prince Rama saving his kidnapped wife Sita. The central idea is that of good triumphing over evil and light triumphing over darkness; the most iconic elements are the lighting of small clay oil lamps, the composition of auspicious circular floor patterns, the hanging of marigold garlands on the doors and the service of elaborate potluck feasts.

Although less well known in North America, the profile of Diwali has grown here, in large part thanks to some famous celebrants. Among them is a graduate of FACE and Westmount High School.

Advertising

Content of the article

“A year ago, around the time of Diwali, Kamala Harris had just received confirmation that she and Joe Biden had won the election,” recalls Montreal writer Mitali Banerjee Ruths, whose first children’s book, Archie Celebrates Diwali (Charlesbridge, 32 pages, $ 19.99) has just been released. They released a statement on social media saying, ‘We look forward to celebrating Diwali at the White House next year. “

While the restrictions linked to the pandemic will likely mean a reduction in Harris’ plans, the the mere act of an Indian-born American vice president is a touchstone for Ruths, 39. The daughter of parents from West Bengal, India, she was born in New York City and raised mainly in Houston, where her father worked as an engineer for NASA. His elementary school was called Space Center Intermediate, so it’s probably no surprise that as a child his ambition was to become an astronaut.

Advertising

Content of the article

“I grew up at the height of international space stations and shuttle programs,” she said. “It was the backdrop to my childhood. I have a vivid memory of being in kindergarten or first grade and watching (the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986) live on TV at school. We didn’t really understand what we were seeing.

In 2003, when another space shuttle crash resulted in the deaths of pioneer Indo-American astronaut Kalpana Chawla and six other crew members, Ruths’ professional goals changed and she became a lawyer. In 2010 – “11 winters ago” as she says – she moved to Montreal and now lives in the Mile End with her husband, a computer science professor at McGill, and their three children, ages 12, 10 and 7 years.

Advertising

Content of the article

“My children have names for us,” she said. “We are Québécois-Texois. I like the fact that he is bilingual.

This same multicultural spirit informs Archie Celebrates Diwali, which has its roots in the childhood of Ruths.

“Diwali time was an interesting juxtaposition,” she recalls. “It’s obviously a very big party in India, but in Texas, for a child, it’s a normal school day. Life goes on as usual. But then you would go home and it would be like stepping into another world. So there I was at school, a Britney Spears fan wearing my Jordache jeans, then coming home and putting on my kurta, putting on my bindi and watching Shah Rukh Khan movies.

One year, Ruths had an idea that foreshadowed the new book.

“I thought it would be nice to bring other (non-Indian) people to the celebration,” she recalls. “As a child, there is a vulnerability that can come from showing people your traditions and your family. What are they going to think? But I was very lucky. It went very well. Children are very curious. They want to learn.

Advertising

Content of the article

An image from the book Archie Celebrates Diwali by Montrealer Mitali Banerjee Ruths, illustrated by Parwinder Singh.
An image from the book Archie Celebrates Diwali by Montrealer Mitali Banerjee Ruths, illustrated by Parwinder Singh. Photo by Charlesbridge

In Archie Celebrates Diwali, the main character – a young girl whose name is the abbreviation of Archana – invites a group of school friends to his family home. When a storm spoils the outdoor Diwali decorations and cuts off the electricity, they are forced to improvise and the “lights” of the festival of lights take on extra meaning. The book advocates for intercultural respect and inclusiveness; the message is reinforced by illustrations by Parwinder Singh, whose palette creatively incorporates the vivid colors of many of the foods served at Diwali.

A festival that favors public celebrations and neighborhood sociability is naturally faced with major fundamental constraints at this time.

Advertising

Content of the article

“Last year Diwali was very low key to our family,” said Ruths. “We lit sparklers in the park and FaceTimed with my parents in Texas. It was a weird feeling, so this year there is the desire to reunite safely with people as much as we can. I coordinate with friends to have Diwali at home – my kids are learning a dance performance for it, and there will be food. It’s just about sitting down and being with each other.

Hoping that next year’s Festival of Lights will regain all its glory.

IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE

Mitali Banerjee Ruths will mark Archie Celebrates Diwali’s post with a Live Zoom event via Blue Willow Bookshop in Houston, TX on Saturday, November 6 at 3 p.m. EST; visit bluewillowbookshop.com for details.

ianmcgillis2@gmail.com

  1. Josh Freed’s COVID Columns in the Montreal Gazette Create a Living Social History

  2. “I wanted people who hadn't studied music but were curious about it to get a feel for this world,” Robyn Sarah says of Music, Late and Soon, in which she recounts lessons from the world. childhood and adolescence and revivals - with the same teacher - after 35 years.

    Montreal poet Robyn Sarah’s memoir recounts a life spent with the piano

  3. The Vietnam War

    Em by author Kim Thúy continues his exploration of the Vietnamese experience

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Check out our community guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montrealers-diwali-book-for-children-lights-up-the-hindu-festival/feed/ 0
Robert Bolden, Canadian sentenced to death in the United States since 2006, dies of natural causes https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/robert-bolden-canadian-sentenced-to-death-in-the-united-states-since-2006-dies-of-natural-causes/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/robert-bolden-canadian-sentenced-to-death-in-the-united-states-since-2006-dies-of-natural-causes/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 01:11:09 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/robert-bolden-canadian-sentenced-to-death-in-the-united-states-since-2006-dies-of-natural-causes/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links World New Bolden had fought for his death sentence to be overturned; his last court hearing came just days before his death in September Author of the article: Tyler dawson Robert Bolden, a 48-year-old Newfoundland-born man convicted of murdering a security guard in a failed St. Louis bank robbery in 2002. Photo […]]]>


[ad_1]

Bolden had fought for his death sentence to be overturned; his last court hearing came just days before his death in September

Content of the article

Robert Bolden, a Canadian sentenced to death in the United States since 2006, has died of natural causes.

Advertising

Content of the article

Bolden, 58, was one of two Canadians threatened with execution in the United States. The other, Ronald Allen Smith, an Albertan, is on Montana state death row.

Bolden had fought for his death sentence to be overturned; his last court hearing was just days before his death in a medical prison in Springfield, Missouri, in September. The US Bureau of Prisons says he died of natural causes.

In October 2002, Bolden shot dead a bank warden, Nathan Ley, in a botched robbery in St. Louis, Missouri. Four years later, on August 25, 2006, Bolden was sentenced to death. A statement from Ley’s family remembers him as “kind, funny, responsible and hardworking”.

“We were fortunate that his killer was brought to justice. Too many families do not have this chance, ”said the statement, published via the Bureau of Prisons.

Advertising

Content of the article

Early in his life – and in his later years – Bolden struggled with many health issues. For much of his youth he suffered from poorly controlled diabetes; During the last years of his life, Bolden suffered from stage four kidney disease, lost his eyesight and had considerable mental health issues, court documents show.

  1. Robert Bolden - 48-year-old Newfoundland-born man convicted of killing a security guard in a botched bank robbery in St. Louis in 2002.

    A Canadian on Death Row: The Untold Story of Robert Bolden

  2. Ronald Allen Smith of Red Deer has been on death row in Montana since 1983 for the murder of two young Native cousins.

    Lethal injection death gets suspended, could lead to execution of Canadian

The US Bureau of Prisons did not respond to the National Post’s request for more information on the cause of death.

The case represented a particularly strange case for Canada, as for many years during Bolden’s legal battles the Canadian government was unaware that a Canadian was in danger of being executed abroad.

Advertising

Content of the article

The Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, to which the United States is a signatory, requires a nation to allow those arrested to contact their consulate for assistance.

Bolden was not so lucky. And the Canadian government didn’t find out that a Canadian citizen was on death row until 2012 – six years after his conviction.

This was a crucial aspect of Bolden’s fight to avoid death, in which his lawyer, Jennifer Merrigan, argued that Bolden’s trial lawyers had failed by not contacting the Canadian government.

“They knew it was their responsibility to contact a foreign government… and then they didn’t contact Canada without ever learning how Canada could have helped them,” Merrigan said at the final court hearing in September.

Advertising

Content of the article

Merrigan did not respond to the National Post’s request for comment. Neither can the Canadian government.

Robert Bolden was born in Stephenville, a town south of Corner Brook, on the west coast of Newfoundland, in 1963. His mother, Stella Decker, was a prostitute, his father, allegedly an American serviceman named Curtis Roberts , has never been a part of his life.

They knew it was their responsibility to contact a foreign government… and then they failed to contact Canada

Rather, Bolden grew up with Lavale Bolden, another American soldier, as his father. For Robert Bolden, his family life was one of “domestic violence, alcoholism and drug addiction,” with Lavale Bolden, a heroin addict, and Stella Decker, an alcoholic, struggling constantly.

Robert Bolden developed his own addictions, and he “spent a lot of his time in the basement … smoking crack, drinking alcohol, and blowing turpentine when alcohol and crack were not. available, ”says a psychiatrist’s report contained in court documents.

Advertising

Content of the article

Yet court documents portrayed Bolden as a devoted father; his daughter, Ariel Bolden, described him as “really wonderful,” according to a court transcript.

“He did a lot of things with us and our friends. He took us to the movies. He collected Pokémon cards with us. He took us swimming; took us to Six Flags when her job went to Six Flags and a lot of things like that, ”she said.

His son, Robert Bolden, said his father had taken him fishing. They played basketball and video games together, and he always pushed his kids to get good grades in school, the son said.

“He was a huge influence at school for me. That’s why I wanted to stay in school, because of him. I wanted to do my best in school so that I could make him proud, ”his son said.

• Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter:

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. See our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.


[ad_2]

]]>
https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/robert-bolden-canadian-sentenced-to-death-in-the-united-states-since-2006-dies-of-natural-causes/feed/ 0
Montreal’s costume shops and bars are going up in flames for Halloween this year https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreals-costume-shops-and-bars-are-going-up-in-flames-for-halloween-this-year/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreals-costume-shops-and-bars-are-going-up-in-flames-for-halloween-this-year/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 22:52:51 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreals-costume-shops-and-bars-are-going-up-in-flames-for-halloween-this-year/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links New Local News But the global pandemic will ensure it still won’t be normal this weekend. Author of the article: Brendan Kelly • Montreal Gazette One of the hottest costumes this Halloween is inspired by Netflix’s Squid Game. Marc Choran, owner of Giggles costume store in LaSalle, is seen on Friday October […]]]>


[ad_1]

But the global pandemic will ensure it still won’t be normal this weekend.

Content of the article

As COVID cases continue to decline in Quebec, it looks like it’s going to be a much more action-packed Halloween this year, both for candy-lovers and people who go to parties. But the shadow of the pandemic will ensure it still won’t be a normal Halloween this weekend.

Advertising

Content of the article

Bars were closed during the Halloween period last year, but at least some will be having costume parties on Saturday night, the day before Halloween. But customers will have to wear protective masks as opposed to Halloween masks and capacity remains limited.

Marc Choran, owner of Giggles costume store in LaSalle, said the arrival of much of his Halloween merchandise has been delayed due to slowdowns in international distribution. But he finally received his suits on time and is happy to report that business has been booming in recent weeks. It was also difficult for him to manage his Giggles store and his pop-up costume shop in Hudson. Like restaurant and bar owners, he struggles to find enough people for available jobs.

Advertising

Content of the article

The other problem for costume stores like Giggles is trying to predict what the upcoming Halloween trends will be. In the past, he ordered most of his costumes in January, and most of the hot trends were based on Hollywood movies. But there were few major movie releases during the pandemic and now he says trendy costume items are triggered by shows on streaming services like Netflix. Problem is, the hot show could be brand new, and that’s exactly what happened this year. He says one of the best-selling costumes is based on the popular Korean Netflix series Squid Game, which has only become a phenomenon in recent weeks.

“I don’t buy that many things in January because I don’t know what’s going to be popular or not,” Choran said. “We were able to import products inspired by Squid Game, but we had to bring them directly from China. We brought him in by plane.

Advertising

Content of the article

Bar owners and managers are feeling optimistic as they are open for Halloween this year and the provincial government is easing many of the restrictions on bars effective November 1.

“It’s exciting,” said Joe Pilotte, COO of The Orchard Group, which manages the seven Ye Olde Orchard pubs in the Montreal area. “To be honest with you, I’ll be a little more excited for St. Patrick’s Day. We were shut down just as this happened (in March 2020) and we missed two in a row, and it’s obviously our Mardi Gras.

“But Halloween is a prelude to Christmas and, yes, we are looking forward to it. It’s the holiday season. We are looking forward to Halloween. We think it will be a fun time. And the next day, November 1, we moves on to a few fewer restrictions. The news is definitely improving. It’s great to be outside again. Halloween gives people a reason to dress up and feel like 2019 again. “

Advertising

Content of the article

Rick Lourensse, co-owner of the Next Door pub in NDG, is also excited to be able to throw a costume party, but he notes that the only difference this year is that if your costume includes a Halloween mask, you won’t be able to wear it in. walking around the bar. You will need to wear your usual pandemic mask.

There will be a Halloween street party on Crescent Street between de Maisonneuve Boulevard. and Ste-Catherine Street West Thursday through Saturday night, and that should help business, said Ziggy Eichenbaum, owner of Ziggy’s Pub.

“But I think nothing will be normal,” Eichenbaum said.

bkelly@postmedia.com

twitter.com/brendanshowbiz

  1. Our children deserve to be children again during the pandemic, if only for one dark and spooky Halloween night, writes Allison Hanes.

    Coronavirus updates: Halloween is gone, but ‘no more bingos’

  2. Bev Hall and Don Jackson use a hockey stick and basket to hand out candy or spell candy in Montreal West on Saturday October 31, 2020.

    COVID-19 Updates, October 22: Don’t Shout “Trick or Treat”, Quebec Tells Kids Before Another Halloween Pandemichttps: //montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/covid-19-updates-montreal – quebec-new-cases-vaccine-passport-vaccination-canada-proof-download-international-travel-October-22

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. See our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.


[ad_2]

]]>
https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreals-costume-shops-and-bars-are-going-up-in-flames-for-halloween-this-year/feed/ 0
Allison Hanes: Stabbing death a wake-up call on youth violence https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/allison-hanes-stabbing-death-a-wake-up-call-on-youth-violence/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/allison-hanes-stabbing-death-a-wake-up-call-on-youth-violence/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 23:37:05 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/allison-hanes-stabbing-death-a-wake-up-call-on-youth-violence/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links Opinion Chroniclers The stabbing of a teenager outside a school in Côte-des-Neiges and a macabre video touting it are signs that we are letting the youth of Montreal down. Author of the article: Allison Hanes • Montreal Gazette Release date : 21 October 2021 • 3 days ago • 4 minutes to […]]]>


[ad_1]

The stabbing of a teenager outside a school in Côte-des-Neiges and a macabre video touting it are signs that we are letting the youth of Montreal down.

Content of the article

If the fatal stabbing of a student outside a Côte-des-Neiges high school this week wasn’t shocking enough, a social media video that has surfaced showing masked youths celebrating the death and making fun of the victim’s friends is a whole new level of inconvenience.

Advertising

Content of the article

Jannai Dopwell-Bailey, 16, was stabbed in the upper body during a scuffle on Van Horne Avenue near Plamondon metro station on Monday. He sought refuge inside Coronation School, which housed the Mile End program where he was a student. Dopwell-Bailey was rushed to hospital where he later died of his injuries.

As Montreal police investigate the homicide and the English Montreal School Board sends crisis counselors to help staff and students cope with the trauma, La Presse reported on Tuesday the existence of an alarming video .

It shows two youths wearing balaclavas and wielding a large knife dancing to loud music while hurling crass insults. The words “Pick yo manz up !! In English is printed on the images. He also refers to “Twizzy,” which would be Dopwell-Bailey’s nickname, as well as “160,” which is apparently a neighborhood clique.

Advertising

Content of the article

A rivalry between C̫te-des-Neiges 160 and OXB Рaka Oxford Block, another group named after Oxford Street in Notre-Dame-de-Gr̢ce Рcould be at the root of the dispute in which Dopwell -Bailey was stabbed, La Presse continued to report.

The loss of any young life is tragic, especially when it is due to senseless violence. But the circumstances surrounding the death are particularly frightening – and should sound the alarm bells about an epidemic of violence infecting Montreal’s youth.

Montreal is already grappling with an upsurge in gun crime, in large part due to conflicts between street gangs. A cycle of targeted shootings followed by retaliatory killings has unfolded in recent months, particularly in the northern and eastern ends of the city.

Advertising

Content of the article

Jannai Dopwell-Bailey was a student at Program Mile End High School on Van Horne Avenue.  He died on Monday.  According to Montreal police, he was fatally stabbed during an altercation with other teenagers outside his school.
Jannai Dopwell-Bailey was a student at Program Mile End High School on Van Horne Avenue. He died on Monday. According to Montreal police, he was fatally stabbed during an altercation with other teenagers outside his school. Photo courtesy of Chesla Dopwell

Dopwell-Bailey may have been stabbed – and the rivalry behind his murder may not have been linked to the hardened criminal gangs familiar to the police – but his death fits a disturbing pattern nonetheless.

Social media video glorifies gangster culture and gratuitous violence. Whether broadcast by the actual authors or just cowardly sidekicks, the insensitivity shown by the participants is devastating to watch.

It’s certainly salt in the wounds of Dopwell-Bailey’s grieving friends and family – and it’s exactly the kind of provocation that invites retaliation, perpetuating a loop of unnecessary brutality followed by excruciating pain. .

Public safety has become a major issue in the mayor’s campaign and gun violence has become a key priority for Montreal police as bullets fly almost daily. Millions of dollars and many new resources are being invested in the fight against the scourge of gun crime.

Advertising

Content of the article

But these are the young people we desperately need to invest in.

Finicky kids are easily drawn to the sense of belonging, money, and power that comes from gang membership, especially when they don’t have much else in their life. Maybe not all cabals are at the level of organized crime syndicates fighting drugs with powerful weapons, but neighborhood factions can be a gateway to this dangerous way of life.

Seekers can be sucked into an underworld from which it is difficult to emerge. Lost souls can be pressured to do stupid and terrible things out of loyalty to a cause or to their brethren.

We need to tackle the cultural influences that advocate the gang lifestyle and desensitize impressionable minds to violence, whether it’s social media, video games, television, movies, or music.

Advertising

Content of the article

We need to catch the young people who fall through the cracks of broken homes, disadvantaged backgrounds and a broken education system before they find themselves with guns – or knives.

Many community organizations that valiantly try to help at-risk children through sports, recreation and recreation programs operate on tight budgets and lack stable funding.

Last month, the city announced an additional $ 5 million to groups working to reduce youth violence, but it’s still a fraction of the money that goes to heavy-handed police action to crack down on gangs that are already have become a social scourge.

Montreal police are deploying prevention teams on community patrols in neighborhoods that have seen an increase in violence, but it needs to happen on a much larger scale, across the city, to address the root causes of the violence. crime and reaching disgruntled young people.

The Dopwell-Bailey murder – and the gruesome video touting the murder – is a wake-up call that we can no longer afford to let the youth of Montreal down.

ahanes@postmedia.com

  1. A Montreal police investigator examines a bullet hole in a car at the scene of a shooting in Rivière-des-Prairies on August 2, 2021, which left three people dead and two others injured.

    Allison Hanes: We can only control, not eliminate gangs, warns criminologist

  2. Police alone can’t solve gun violence, say Montreal-North residents

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Check out our community guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/allison-hanes-stabbing-death-a-wake-up-call-on-youth-violence/feed/ 0
Pellerin: Montreal shows it’s smart by focusing on people rather than cars https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/pellerin-montreal-shows-its-smart-by-focusing-on-people-rather-than-cars/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/pellerin-montreal-shows-its-smart-by-focusing-on-people-rather-than-cars/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/pellerin-montreal-shows-its-smart-by-focusing-on-people-rather-than-cars/ [ad_1] Breadcrumb Links Opinion Chroniclers Did you know that Ste-Catherine Street is now mostly pedestrianized? Me neither, and I almost passed out. It was once a rite of passage for Quebec teenagers to survive jaywalking there. Author of the article: Brigitte Pellerin Release date : 03 Sep 2021 • September 3, 2021 • 3 minutes […]]]>


[ad_1]

Did you know that Ste-Catherine Street is now mostly pedestrianized? Me neither, and I almost passed out. It was once a rite of passage for Quebec teenagers to survive jaywalking there.

Content of the article

You never know how much you’ve missed Montreal until you go back and realize, damn smoked meat, how long has it been? In my case, long enough for the city to have transformed from a barely organized death trap to a most enjoyable paradise of safe and active transit. By North American standards, anyway. And it is a beautiful tribute to a strong and stubborn woman, Mayor Valérie Plante.

Advertising

Content of the article

I understand that it is far from perfect. She is currently running for re-election and nothing like a campaign to highlight the flaws of an incumbent. But damn it, she transformed my beloved hometown for the better by making it safe and enjoyable for walking or cycling.

I drove with my teenager from Ottawa and parked (for free) at the Montmorency terminus in Laval. From there, we hopped on the metro and went to Plateau Mont-Royal to enjoy a bowl of café au lait on St-Denis. The number of streets open to pedestrians amazed me. And the cycle paths on St-Denis, my God! Where we previously had four manic lanes of traffic, we now have two protected and wide bike lanes, space for patios and two lanes for motor vehicles. And guess what? This Sunday morning, there were more people on bikes than in cars.

Advertising

Content of the article

We rented BIXI bikes ourselves. There are stations everywhere – and when you download the app, it will tell you where the closest is. We went from the Plateau to the current mountain to downtown via the ghetto and the McGill campus, almost all the way on protected paths.

Unbelievable. There are no helmet regulations (except for electric bikes, which everyone ignores in Montreal fashion) and I wasn’t at all nervous about it precisely because we were on protected paths. If you are not at risk of being hit by a car, there is very little reason to wear protective gear. Which was just as good, considering I was wearing a skirt and flip flops. After 45 minutes of smiling pedaling, we docked our bikes at the university near Ste-Catherine and continued on our way.

Advertising

Content of the article

Did you know that Ste-Catherine is now mostly pedestrianized? Me neither, and I almost passed out. It was once a rite of passage for Quebec teenagers to survive jaywalking there. Fortunately, there is still a lot of work going on, which helped me reorient myself, because what is Montreal in summer without an impressive collection of orange cones?

The fact that Montreal is slowly transforming into an active transportation paradise did not come easily or without controversy. When she ran for mayor in 2017, Plante campaigned on a platform of transparency and collaboration with the public. And it turned out that not everyone was happy when she started slamming bike lanes everywhere. In particular, on Saint-Denis Street (Bank Street in the Plateau Mont-Royal), merchants were worried about the disappearance of parking spaces. Reminds you of something?

Advertising

Content of the article

Obviously she kept going and today there is quite a bit of happiness on this street, at least the part that I saw. It will be interesting to see the voters’ verdict later this fall.

Especially since it doubles the stake: last month, Plante unveiled an $ 885 million plan to electrify and diversify transport in his city, with a view to achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. BIXI electric bicycles already represent 20% of the fleet.

Meanwhile in Ottawa it’s all we can do to allow e-cargo bikes on our streets and we have ditched bike sharing because it costs money and we are terribly stingy when it s. It’s about spending tiny sums on cool stuff to fight climate change and improve human happiness. Can you hear my eyes roll from where you are?

Oh, and you know what else? Roads also cost money, but somehow we still have a lot of public money for that. I hope that Valérie Plante will be re-elected to show other politicians that it pays to bet on people, not on cars.

READ MORE: Pinder: Walking against the “windshield” bias – a story of two Bank Streets

Brigitte Pellerin is an Ottawa writer.

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Visit our Community rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail The settings.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/pellerin-montreal-shows-its-smart-by-focusing-on-people-rather-than-cars/feed/ 0