Every member of the McMahon family, ranked worst to best as an on-screen performer

The McMahons have been the most influential people in the wrestling world since the 1980s, when Vince McMahon Jr. bought WWE from his father Vince McMahon Sr. A bold approach to wrestling and business saw the Vince we know today bankrupt territories and take WWE in the mainstream. Ideas like having celebrities involved, a great show of WrestleManiaand the general cutthroat mentality towards business was radically different from that of his father.


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WWE eventually moved forward with Mr. McMahon as a heel character in the Attitude Era. Vince’s role also prompted the addition of his on-screen children Shane and Stephanie. Family wife and mother Linda finally joined the entire WWE television household in 1999. Triple H was already a wrestler, but he became part of the family by marrying Stephanie. The five family members had different strengths and weaknesses. Each name will be ranked solely based on their work as an on-screen talent.


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5/5 Linda McMahon

Vince and Linda McMahonWWE

WWE’s run for Linda McMahon has seen her mostly contribute behind the scenes on the business side of things. Vince and Linda were the main decision makers for years since it was their money that was on the line. However, WWE tried to improve on-screen family stories by casting Linda as a character because it made logical sense. .

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Linda’s on-screen persona started out as an easy-to-understand face. Linda served as a foil for Vince or their children whenever they had heel roles. WWE has used Linda less often than others for major moments like her divorce from Vince or getting slapped by Stephanie. Linda also always had a unique bond with Shane as their relationship grew closer like the characters of Vince and Stephanie. A heel moment saw Linda shockingly turn against Jim Ross to align herself with the rest of the McMahon family. Unfortunately, Linda didn’t have the charisma to have the same heritage as a performer as the others.

4/5 Shane McMahon

close up shane-mcmahon

Shane McMahon may be the McMahon family’s most beloved character, but his latest run may have damaged that reputation. Fans loved Shane as the face character because it meant he could get in on those high-risk stunts and have fun matches against heel characters. However, WWE has used Shane enough in the face and heel roles.

Shane’s first run as a heel character in The Corporation and Corporate Ministry factions kept him on television. A face feuding with Vince and becoming the new owner of WCW may have been Shane’s pinnacle as a character. Epic matches with Kurt Angle, Big Show and Vince made Shane a beloved character. Things would become inconsistent with Shane entering and leaving the company. The 2010s comeback started well with massive fan interest, but it also began to expose its weaknesses. Shane’s heel spin made him one of the worst parts of the show before controversially leaving.

3/5 Stephanie McMahon

Stephanie McMahon

Fan perception of Stephanie McMahon has often been negative due to her heel persona bullying others, but she is a great performer. Stephanie honed heel authority figure roles by cutting believable promos and having audiences root against her. Stephanie’s first signs of success came when she married Triple H onscreen to form the McMahon-Helmsley alliance.

Triple H took it to the next level in part because Stephanie was such a strong heel. The stories with Kurt Angle, Chris Jericho and others made her a great addition to the show. A face turned as the Smackdown General Manager began the most underrated period of her screen career. WWE bringing back Stephanie at various times over the past decade has confirmed that she is still a terrific heel character. The biggest argument against Stephanie is that few face characters have ever had one on her. However, Stephanie is clearly doing more than defending herself when portraying the on-screen villain we love to hate.

2/5 Vince McMahon

Vince McMahon WWE

Golden Era and New Generation Era fans first knew Vince McMahon as a play-by-play commentator since he never referenced his property. Vince was considered a solid broadcaster, but WWE took more advantage of his heel persona in the Attitude era. The heel turn after the Montreal Screwjob made Mr. McMahon’s character perfect for feuding with Steve Austin.

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WWE made huge sums of money by having Vince as an evil authority figure trying to hold down Austin and others. The character became the series’ best villain, although McMahon rarely had any matches. Those rare in-ring moments became an attraction for WWE to bank on its heat. Even the face chapters of Vince’s on-screen career saw him know how to tap into what worked for each character. McMahon is a polarizing character for good reason and WWE might be better off without him leading the show, but he deserves a lot of credit for his on-screen contributions during his heyday.

1/5 Triple H

Triple H Returns

The on-screen character side of Triple H’s career appears to be behind him after retiring from the ring and rarely being on TV since taking over from Vince McMahon as the series’ lead. Triple H has been an all-time great wrestler who has thrived in different eras. WWE has seen him evolve from mid-carder to main eventer, superstar to legend.

Triple H’s matches could not be matched by McMahon’s other parents as they were attraction artists who struggled when needed. Triple H was making a living performing onscreen long before he went behind the scenes. WWE pushed him for almost two decades in the best matches and angles. Even the non-ring side of Triple H’s character worked perfectly. Triple H played a big heel as the leader of The Authority. Feuds with Daniel Bryan, Seth Rollins, and Batista have each provided more reason to believe he’s the best on-screen character in the McMahon family, even eliminating match performance from the equation.

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