Montreal music – WPFG Montreal 2017 http://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 02:39:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Montreal music – WPFG Montreal 2017 http://wpfgmontreal2017.com/ 32 32 THE SLIP’S BRAD BARR TALKS ABOUT NEW MUSIC, THE MONTREAL MUSICAL SCENE AND THE NEXT SOLO ALBUM https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-slips-brad-barr-talks-about-new-music-the-montreal-musical-scene-and-the-next-solo-album/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 19:52:30 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-slips-brad-barr-talks-about-new-music-the-montreal-musical-scene-and-the-next-solo-album/ Most of the bands with the success and longevity of The Slip would stack tour dates on top of tour dates to capitalize on the accumulated goodwill of the fans and the recognition of their catalog. But as fans of the Montreal trio have understood, the group chooses their spots, going in different directions to […]]]>

Most of the bands with the success and longevity of The Slip would stack tour dates on top of tour dates to capitalize on the accumulated goodwill of the fans and the recognition of their catalog. But as fans of the Montreal trio have understood, the group chooses their spots, going in different directions to work on other music and meeting occasionally, as they do now for a short series of dates that will take them to the the new Brooklyn Bowl Philadelphia on Wednesday November 17, the original Brooklyn Bowl on Thursday November 18 and Friday November 19, and Levon Helm Studios in Woodstock on Saturday November 20.

“There is nothing so strategic. It’s really something instinctive and it’s kind of a feeling, ”says guitarist and singer Brad Barr, who is joined in The Slip by his brother Andrew Barr on drums and bassist Marc Friedman. “In this case, I mean because of the pandemic and what it has done to create space in our schedules. In theory, if the pandemic hadn’t happened, maybe the Barr Brothers would have been on tour by now and released a record.

“So we weren’t on any kind of touring cycle. It kind of opened up that space for us to fill, and it coincided with the (festival at Lockn ‘Farm in Virginia) that Joe Russo invited us to play with him. And after that, all these offers came in. Sometimes I feel like that feather at the end of ‘Forrest Gump.’ It’s sort of a combination of that and a certain amount of personal willpower. I tend to let situations go at their own pace and then see how I can make the most of it.

In time for the fall dates, The Slip released a new song last week, “Superterranean Onlyness”, their first new music since the 2006 album “Eisenhower”. The new track comes from a batch of songs the band recorded with engineer Steve Albini, known for his work on Nirvana’s “In Utero” album in 1993, as well as artists like The Pixies and The Breeders. The Slip followed Albini for three days when he was in town in 2018 to host a production seminar at a friend’s house in the group’s studio.

Barr said he and his brother have spent the past few weeks completing the trail.

“There were placeholder words,” he says. “For me, for a song, to kind of push it forward to the point where I would record it in a session, there has to be at least one or two lines that I can base on the lyrics. This one had that, it had the title, the chorus, ‘The One Superterranean Will Really Do It To You’, and it was prepandemic, in fact, that I had those lyrics. Everything else I sang with scratch and fill vocals which didn’t make much sense to me. It was just a matter of sitting down with something, just me going to the studio for a few weeks to sing it (last week) and I would go out everyday with a version of the lyrics and listen and decide what was good and what was not. This is kind of how I operate. If I have a tagline that I can gravitate towards and write about, then I can try things out. So what I have finished is a whole new set of lyrics.

Barr said the band had three songs from the Albini sessions “and all that stuff from 10 years ago that probably should get out one way or another.

Like any band, The Slip has songs that are loved more by fans than others, but the trio feels no pressure to include them in their setlists.

“It’s liberating, to feel that there is nothing we have to do,” says Barr. “I think the only criterion is to choose music where the arrangement has room for improvisation and the right amount of composition that is important to us. We just take a step back and make suggestions (what to play on). We had a few rehearsals before Lockn ‘, and I mean we had about 30 songs on the roster. Sometimes you think it would be cool to try to rework this song or try this one that way and change the key, or Marc has a new bassline, and if we put it in the beginning and do it. an intro? … ‘Even Rats’ or ‘Children of December’, something that we played at every gig on the last tour, even these songs, I think I can enjoy them completely fresh, like they were new.

“It’s one of the benefits of taking 10 years off. Nothing looks like a redundant thing.

While The Slip has his aforementioned songs in the works, Barr said the priority right now is to complete new tracks for The Barr Brothers as a follow-up to 2017’s “Queens of the Breakers”.

“We have about 20 demos,” Barr says. “Half is over, the other half has few gaps. … It’s possible that a lot of the songs we wrote end up on a Slip disc. I’m not ruling it out, but it hasn’t really been a discussion. There were Slip tunes that became Barr Brothers tunes, like “Love Ain’t Enough” and even “Belle” and “Give The Devil Back His Heart”. At this point, it’s certainly possible that tunes that started out in the Barr Brothers tenure genre could become Slip tunes. I never really make that distinction until a song is finished.

The Slip began in 1995 in Massachusetts and has grown into a popular piece of the Northeastern jam scene.

“We liked people who got the job done on their instruments and were clearly proficient but didn’t rest like virtuosos,” Barr says. “Take all that knowledge and find a visceral way to channel it into the music. Soul mates, he said, included Lettuce, Schleigho and Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey.

In 2005, after Andrew moved to Montreal to be with his wife, Brad followed suit.

“Initially, The Slip came to Montreal about once a year, almost always in May,” he recalls. “So May in Montreal is wonderful. I was walking around thinking, “Oh my God, these people are happy and beautiful and the sun is shining,” not really realizing that you have to get through this grueling winter, but once May comes, Montreal is so beautiful. … I just remember walking around saying, “This town is really okay with me”, something about the quality of life, the way people are, it’s liberal, it’s unpretentious, it kind of reminded me of Providence in a do-it-yourself, ”he adds, referring to his hometown of Rhode Island.

The inclusiveness of the music scene in Montreal has led to collaborations with people like Richard Reed Parry from Arcade Fire.

“Here in Montreal, he’s just very plugged into the music scene, all the music that comes from Montreal and beyond,” Barr says of Parry. “He’s always excited to learn a new thing and always feels like whatever is going on he wants to figure it out, so he’s a part of many groups of friends that we know. It’s not such a big music community here, especially the English speaking community. I play on a baseball team with Tim from Arcade Fire and Efrim from Godspeed. It’s very amazing, that’s why I love this city. … (Parry) put us in touch with people all over the world who are just great relationships to have. And he can’t wait to play at any occasion. Richie is one of those guys that you just called him up and said, ‘You wanna come into the studio and play standing up with us?’ … I hope my son will grow up to be something like this.

Last week Barr announced the release on January 21, 2022 of a solo instrumental guitar album, “Winter Mission.”

“I finished it about eight months to a year ago,” he says, “although I haven’t really listened to or thought about it for about eight months. At no time is there more than one person playing. It’s a single performance, no overdubs, no guest musicians. It’s really solo guitar, it’s electric guitar and acoustic guitar. … These are all improvisations, I think only one of the songs is a composition. All the others are just sounds or patterns that I improvised on. It really is a feeling of openness.

“A friend of mine, the only guy I played it for, told me it was his favorite record of the year,” Barr says with a laugh.


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THE SLIP’S BRAD BARR TALKS ABOUT NEW MUSIC, THE MONTREAL MUSICAL SCENE AND THE NEXT SOLO ALBUM https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-slips-brad-barr-talks-about-new-music-the-montreal-musical-scene-and-the-next-solo-album-2/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 19:41:49 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/the-slips-brad-barr-talks-about-new-music-the-montreal-musical-scene-and-the-next-solo-album-2/ Most of the bands with the success and longevity of The Slip would stack tour dates on top of tour dates to capitalize on the accumulated goodwill of the fans and the recognition of their catalog. But as fans of the Montreal trio have understood, the group chooses their spots, going in different directions to […]]]>

Most of the bands with the success and longevity of The Slip would stack tour dates on top of tour dates to capitalize on the accumulated goodwill of the fans and the recognition of their catalog. But as fans of the Montreal trio have understood, the group chooses their spots, going in different directions to work on other music and meeting occasionally, as they do now for a short series of dates that will take them to the the new Brooklyn Bowl Philadelphia on Wednesday November 17, the original Brooklyn Bowl on Thursday November 18 and Friday November 19, and Levon Helm Studios in Woodstock on Saturday November 20.

“There is nothing so strategic. It’s really something instinctive and it’s kind of a feeling, ”says guitarist and singer Brad Barr, who is joined in The Slip by his brother Andrew Barr on drums and bassist Marc Friedman. “In this case, I mean because of the pandemic and what it has done to create space in our schedules. In theory, if the pandemic hadn’t happened, maybe the Barr Brothers would have been on tour by now and released a record.

“So we weren’t in some kind of tour cycle. It kind of opened up that space for us to fill, and it coincided with the (festival at Lockn ‘Farm in Virginia) that Joe Russo invited us to play with him. And after that, all of these offers came in. Sometimes I feel like that feather at the end of ‘Forrest Gump.’ It’s sort of a combination of that and a certain amount of personal willpower. I tend to let situations go at their own pace and then see how I can make the most of it.

In time for the fall dates, The Slip released a new song last week, “Superterranean Onlyness”, their first new music since the 2006 album “Eisenhower”. The new track comes from a batch of songs the band recorded with engineer Steve Albini, known for his work on Nirvana’s 1993 album “In Utero”, as well as artists like The Pixies and The Breeders. The Slip followed Albini for three days when he was in town in 2018 to host a production seminar at a friend’s house in the group’s studio.

Barr said he and his brother have spent the last few weeks completing the trail.

“There were placeholder words,” he says. “For me, for a song, to kind of push it forward to the point where I would record it in a session, there has to be at least one or two lines that I can base on the lyrics. This one had that, it had the title, the chorus, ‘The One Superterranean Will Really Do It To You’, and it was prepandemic, in fact, that I had those lyrics. Everything else I sang with scratch and fill vocals which didn’t make much sense to me. It was just a matter of sitting down with something, just me going to the studio for a few weeks to sing it (last week) and I would go out everyday with a version of the lyrics and listen and decide what was good and what was not. This is kind of how I operate. If I have a tagline that I can gravitate towards and write about, then I can try things out. So what I have finished is a whole new set of lyrics.

Barr said the band had three songs from the Albini sessions “and all that stuff from 10 years ago that probably should get out one way or another.

Like any band, The Slip has songs that are loved more by fans than others, but the trio feels no pressure to include them in their setlists.

“It’s liberating, to feel that there is nothing we have to do,” says Barr. “I think the only criterion is to choose music where the arrangement has room for improvisation and the right amount of composition that is important to us. We just take a step back and make suggestions (what to play on). We had a few rehearsals before Lockn ‘, and I mean we had about 30 songs on the roster. Sometimes you think it’d be cool to try to rework that song or try this one out that way and change the key, or Marc has a new bassline, and if we put it in the beginning and do it. an intro? … ‘Even Rats’ or ‘Children of December’, something that we played at every gig on the last tour, even these songs, I think I can enjoy them completely fresh, like they were new.

“It’s one of the benefits of taking 10 years off. Nothing looks like a redundant thing.

While The Slip has his aforementioned songs in the works, Barr said the priority right now is to complete new tracks for The Barr Brothers as a follow-up to 2017’s “Queens of the Breakers”.

“We have about 20 demos,” Barr says. “Half is over, the other half has few gaps. … It’s possible that a lot of the songs we wrote end up on a Slip disc. I’m not ruling it out, but it hasn’t really been a discussion. There were Slip tunes that became Barr Brothers tunes, like “Love Ain’t Enough” and even “Belle” and “Give The Devil Back His Heart”. At this point, it’s certainly possible that tunes that started out in the Barr Brothers tenure genre could become Slip tunes. I never really make that distinction until a song is finished.

The Slip began in 1995 in Massachusetts and has grown into a popular piece of the Northeastern jam scene.

“We liked people who got the job done on their instruments and were clearly proficient but didn’t rest like virtuosos,” Barr says. “Take all that knowledge and find a visceral way to channel it into the music. Soul mates, he said, included Lettuce, Schleigho and Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey.

In 2005, after Andrew moved to Montreal to be with his wife, Brad followed suit.

“Initially, The Slip came to Montreal about once a year, almost always in May,” he recalls. “So May in Montreal is wonderful. I was walking around thinking, “Oh my God, these people are happy and beautiful and the sun is shining,” not really realizing that you have to get through this grueling winter, but once May comes, Montreal is so beautiful. … I just remember walking around saying, “This town really agrees with me”, something about the quality of life, the way people are, it’s liberal, it’s unpretentious, it kind of reminded me of Providence in a do-it-yourself, ”he adds, referring to his hometown of Rhode Island.

The inclusiveness of the music scene in Montreal has led to collaborations with people like Richard Reed Parry from Arcade Fire.

“Here in Montreal, he’s just very plugged into the music scene, all the music from Montreal and beyond,” Barr says of Parry. “He’s always excited to learn a new thing and always feels like whatever is going on he wants to figure it out, so he’s a part of many groups of friends that we know. It’s not such a big music community here, especially the English speaking community. I play on a baseball team with Tim from Arcade Fire and Efrim from Godspeed. It’s very amazing, that’s why I love this city. … (Parry) put us in touch with people all over the world who are just great relationships to have. And he can’t wait to play at any occasion. Richie is one of those guys that you just called him up and said, ‘You wanna come into the studio and play stand up with us?’ … I hope my son will grow up to be something like this.

Last week Barr announced the release on January 21, 2022 of a solo instrumental guitar album, “Winter Mission.”

“I finished it about eight months to a year ago,” he says, “although I haven’t really listened to or thought about it for about eight months. At no time is there more than one person playing. It’s a single performance, no overdubs, no guest musicians. It’s really solo guitar, it’s electric guitar and acoustic guitar. … These are all improvisations, I think only one of the songs is a composition. All the others are just sounds or patterns that I improvised on. It really is a feeling of openness.

“A friend of mine, the only guy I played it for, told me it was his favorite record of the year,” Barr says with a laugh.


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Montreal musical institution celebrates milestone this month https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-musical-institution-celebrates-milestone-this-month/ Sun, 24 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-musical-institution-celebrates-milestone-this-month/ MONTREAL – Cheap Thrill’s location on Metcalfe Street is an oddity in downtown Montreal now dominated by modern chain stores. The rickety stairs leading to the store, a flashback to a bygone architectural past. And inside the store, you could be forgiven for thinking that they boarded a time machine. “It’s amazing. I think it’s […]]]>

MONTREAL – Cheap Thrill’s location on Metcalfe Street is an oddity in downtown Montreal now dominated by modern chain stores.

The rickety stairs leading to the store, a flashback to a bygone architectural past.

And inside the store, you could be forgiven for thinking that they boarded a time machine.

“It’s amazing. I think it’s very lucky of us, we’ve just stood the test of time and we’re the last in town,” said owner Gary Worsley, who purchased the store to its original owner four years ago, after working there for two decades.

There was a time, 30 years ago, when people couldn’t give away their record collection because CDs were all the rage.

But Cheap Thrills has weathered the storm and is now celebrating its 50th anniversary. The original store on Bishop Street closed in the 1990s.

“We kept the vinyl, but it was difficult to get new ones,” says Morsley. “People didn’t come with them used, they came with tons of used CDs.”

But when consumers ditched CDs and turned to digital streaming, something unusual happened.

A few customers started asking for vinyl records that were still being produced on a smaller scale in Europe.

“He made a comeback here, I would say ten years ago. And it’s really strong right now, ”observes Morsley, who was just a teenager when record companies started phasing out vinyl records.

At first, most stores and record companies thought it was a fad.

But it turns out a new generation wanted to find out what it was like to own a physical copy of recorded music – conditioned the way their parents bought music.

Fernando Diaz, 36, grew up with CDs, but now buys vinyls.

“The sound, the way you experience music, is different,” says Dias while holding a copy of Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd, a classic record released 48 years ago.

Depending on the record industry, the average vinyl record buyer is now 25 to 34 years old.

This has led to the opening of many new millennial oriented stores.

But Cheap Thrills has always stayed close to its 1960s hipster roots as it enters its sixth decade in business.

It still stocks second-hand books from beat writers, as well as musical classics from a bygone era, but is adapting to its new clientele.

“We have to store Taylor Swift and Lorde and Billie Eilish because these records sell and they help sell other records,” says Worsley.

And if the past is any indication, the vinyl record obituary has yet to be written at Cheap Thrills.

Correction:

An earlier version of this article said the record store was in Mansfield, not Metcalfe.


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Montreal Music and Arts Festivals Prepare for “Unprecedented” Summer https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-music-and-arts-festivals-prepare-for-unprecedented-summer/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-music-and-arts-festivals-prepare-for-unprecedented-summer/#respond Sat, 24 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-music-and-arts-festivals-prepare-for-unprecedented-summer/ With Osheaga canceled for 2021 and the Jazz Festival postponed to September, Montrealers might feel like this summer will only prolong the drought of live cultural events in the city. However, despite the uncertainty of future pandemic restrictions, several festivals are planning to move forward, adopting hybrid models and downscaling their events to comply with […]]]>

With Osheaga canceled for 2021 and the Jazz Festival postponed to September, Montrealers might feel like this summer will only prolong the drought of live cultural events in the city.

However, despite the uncertainty of future pandemic restrictions, several festivals are planning to move forward, adopting hybrid models and downscaling their events to comply with guidelines.

One such event is the Montreal Fringe Festival, which runs June 1-20, kicking off the festival season with a mix of online and in-person performances.

Amy Blackmore, executive and artistic director of the MainLine Theater and the St-Ambroise Montreal Fringe Festival, said CBC’s Daybreak the Fringe typically has between 100 and 115 shows in 20 venues.

This year, it will downsize, with 30 to 35 shows in four or five venues.

“We’re going to be very transparent with all of our artists and all of our audience about what the experience will be like,” Blackmore said.

“For example, there will be reduced capacity at our sites, tons of COVID-19 safety precautions, and people on site to help everyone have a good experience, stay safe and enjoy the art. . “

Amy Blackmore is the general and artistic director of the St-Ambroise Montreal Fringe Festival. This year’s edition will be quite different from previous years, but the team is dedicated to putting on a show despite the pandemic restrictions. (Cindy Lopez / Montreal Fringe Festival)

As Montreal is designated a red zone, cinemas and auditoriums cannot accommodate more than 250 people, depending on capacity, and the sale of food and drink is not permitted. Whether these rules become looser or stricter by the summer is up to everyone.

Blackmore said that with the ever-changing situation, his team are “ready to change in no time.”

“We have an A to Z plan.”

Having had to move last year’s event online, Blackmore is keen to celebrate the festival’s 30th anniversary and has launched a fundraising campaign to keep the event alive.

“I feel a very big responsibility with 30 years,” she said. “I want the bangs to exist for years to come. It’s an integral part of Montreal’s independent arts community and that’s really how Montreal starts the summer.

Fantasia also hopes to host screenings in person.

Another festival that aims to welcome an audience in person is the Fantasia Film Festival.

(Fancy)

Departure scheduled for August 5 to 25, founder and CEO Pierre Corbeil told Daybreak he also plans to follow a hybrid model, offering films that can be shown at home and in theaters.

“We are known around the world for having the craziest screenings with a very enthusiastic, excited and responsive audience,” Corbeil said. “[At home] it’s not the same, but it’s still a lot better than doing nothing and canceling. “

Also celebrating an anniversary, the 20th of the festival, Corbeil said the event will open with the world premiere of Quebec film Brain Freeze, which he describes as a zombie comedy.

He said that with the festival in a few months, there is still time to adjust the plan according to the rules.

“We hope that the possibilities will be much greater than what we can currently envisage,” he said.

The Just for Laughs Festival is set to return for its 2021 edition July 15-31, although organizers have yet to announce how the festival will operate and whether it will include in-person events.

Mutek back in August

For its part, the Mutek music and electronic arts festival is scheduled to take place at the end of August.

Artistic director Alain Mongeau told Daybreak that “it has been so difficult to predict exactly what will be possible” but his team is ready to throw an event anyway.

Last year, Mutek prepared to host the whole festival online and even created a custom virtual platform. Ultimately, they were able to host events in person with social distancing.

Mutek, pictured here in 2019, is another festival eager to welcome a live audience again. (Mutek press photo / Bruno Destombes)

Mongeau said that unlike other festivals facing challenges, he is fortunate that his event does not rely heavily on international artists.

“We rely a lot on local talent, so we are able to restructure a festival,” he said. “We can reshape the festival and that still makes sense.”

Above all, Mongeau is eager to welcome people back. He thinks the feeling is mutual for the audience.

“We believe that after a year and a half now, everyone will be eager to step away from their screen and be exposed to the culture live.”

Expect a busy September

Dan Seligman, Creative Director of POP Montreal, echoed this sentiment, saying that while September will be an exceptionally busy month with events like Jazz Fest and Francos Montreal, the fan appetite will be there.

“I think there is such a desire for the public to attend cultural events and support artists, I think there should be enough space for everyone,” he said. told Daybreak.

The 2020 edition of the POP Montreal festival included outdoor performances from a distance. (POP Montreal press photo / Coralie Daigneault)

Seligman called the period “unprecedented time” for event planners, adding that “the festival ecosystem has been in crisis mode since last year.”

He said that for “events like Jazz or Osheaga which are such massive undertakings, it’s really hard to pivot on short notice.”

With POP Montreal for several months, Seligman said his team are waiting to see how things turn out, while hoping for the best – a return to normalcy.

“We will be ready to welcome an audience,” he said.


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Celebrating the black artists of Montreal’s music scene https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/celebrating-the-black-artists-of-montreals-music-scene/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/celebrating-the-black-artists-of-montreals-music-scene/#respond Tue, 23 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/celebrating-the-black-artists-of-montreals-music-scene/ Montreal is home to a famous and vibrant music scene, which is indebted to black culture and music. Black musicians have made a major contribution to the local music community, especially in the field of Jazz in the 20th century and continues in all genres today. In honor of Black History Month, The McGill TribuneThe […]]]>

Montreal is home to a famous and vibrant music scene, which is indebted to black culture and music. Black musicians have made a major contribution to the local music community, especially in the field of Jazz in the 20th century and continues in all genres today. In honor of Black History Month, The McGill TribuneThe staff at Arts & Entertainment spotlight four remarkable black musicians from Montreal who made great music.

Hanora

If Amy Winehouse and Snoh ​​Aalegra had a “child voice” it would be Hanora. The texture of her voice is the aural equivalent of feeling silk and lace with a single wave of her hand. Engaged in a gracious and powerful vulnerability, Hanorah’s words could easily stand alone as poetry. Yet the lively tempo of his music does not succumb to the emotional gravity of his lyrics. Hanorah’s music, while seemingly rooted in the soul, isn’t limited to it either. Long road, for example, with his steady, ambulatory rhythm and guitar instrumentals, he has the slightest pinch of country combined with a hybrid pop-soul voice. With an indomitable voice and poignant lyricism, Hanorah, without a doubt, should be on your playlist.

Backxwash

A longtime fan favorite of Montreal’s underground community, Zambian-born Backxwash should be on everyone’s radar, and for good reason. Win the Polaris Prize in 2020 for his album God got nothing to do with it, leave it out of itby effectively securing the highest accolades offered to Canadian artists — Backxwash is indisputably at the forefront of not only hip-hop and rap, but also the very state of contemporary music production. By layering hard-hitting streams on topics ranging from gender identity, racism, and witchcraft to chirping industrial beats, Backxwash takes listeners into its beautifully gruesome world. Aside from being an extraordinary, once in a lifetime talent, Backxwash is also quite funny to Twitter, offering jokes on motivational speakers and knowledge in his wildly inventive creative process.

Harold “Steep” Wade (1918-1953)

Wade was a legendary Canadian jazz musician in the 1930s and 1940s, sharing his musical gifts on piano and saxophone. Born into a Montreal family reluctant to music, Wade combined his autodidact and his studies under Milton smythe to navigate successfully in the classical and jazz styles while in duel. He played the alto saxophone for Myron Sutton’s Canadian Ambassadors and later played the piano with Louis Metcalf International Group at Café St-Michel. As a member of Boptet by Wilkie Wilkinson, Wade helped create the earliest known bebop recordings in Canada. At Café St-Michel, Wade befriended and mentored a young Oscar Peterson, extending his own legacy in jazz through his mentee. Despite the racial tensions in post-depression era music affecting his trading and recording abilities, Wade’s deep dedication to music earned him respect as one of the greats of the growing jazz scene at Montreal.

(http://blueshamilton.blogspot.com)

Kaytranada

If you’ve ever attended Igloofest, Osheaga, or a house party in the Milton-Parc neighborhood, there’s a good chance you’ve followed Kaytranada‘s beats. Born in Port-au-Prince and raised in Montreal, the DJ / producer and winner of the 2016 Polaris Prize has a warm and reserved sound signature, but always dancing. There are no dull moments on any of his two LPs, 99.9% and Bubba, and his 2013 Boiler room performance continue to live in infamy both as a stellar DJ set and as a fascinating documentation of the club’s social dynamics. While Kaytranada’s drum beats vary in complexity and tempo, their pitch sounds hollow and deep, giving the digitally produced dance floors an analog feel. Combined with airy and distorted synths, an ever-moving bassline, and killer vocal features, Kaytranada has mastered the perfect formula to produce Grade A Bops.



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Open mic in park kept Montreal music alive https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/open-mic-in-park-kept-montreal-music-alive/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/open-mic-in-park-kept-montreal-music-alive/#respond Wed, 23 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/open-mic-in-park-kept-montreal-music-alive/ Musician and host Lea Keeley’s weekly event filled a musical gap in the pandemic Marginal artsAlexandre Denis – Posted on September 23, 2020 3 minutes To ward off the blues of her forties, Montreal open-mic host Lea Keeley decided to release the show. Inspired by her fellow open-mic host Frisco Lee, who used Sir George-Étienne […]]]>

Musician and host Lea Keeley’s weekly event filled a musical gap in the pandemic

To ward off the blues of her forties, Montreal open-mic host Lea Keeley decided to release the show.

Inspired by her fellow open-mic host Frisco Lee, who used Sir George-Étienne Cartier Square in Saint-Henri as a pandemic site, she wanted to bring the concept to the Plateau.

Keeley chose the corner of Avenue du Parc and Avenue Duluth in Jeanne-Mance Park. A gentle slope creates a natural auditorium, with the Montreal skyline as a backdrop. The minimal equipment would make it easy to miss, if it weren’t for the groups of people coming in week after week. Open mic Mondays at Jeanne-Mance Park were an immediate success.

“From the start, people just wanted to play live music again. It’s something that we all missed and needed, ”Keeley said.

However, all good things come to an end. The fall cold marked the end of open-air mics. September 21 marked the last iteration of the event at Jeanne-Mance Park, but not necessarily the end. Keeley is looking at potential sites, but as we enter the second wave of the pandemic, she isn’t ruling out taking a break.

“I’m taking it a little day to day and I’m just going to enjoy the last one in the park tonight and see what happens after that,” she said.

Keeley’s love for the open mic dates back to when she moved to Montreal ten years ago from Stratford, Ontario. She began attending the Brutopia open mic, which she would host later, and befriended musicians in the community. She then hosted open microphones at Ye Olde Orchard on Prince-Arthur Street West, and more recently at Local Legend on Saint-Laurent Boulevard.

“[Local Legend was] where it started to take off, ”she said. The Monday night open mic at Local Legend is where her open mic family started, which followed her into the park.

The success of Open Mic Mondays in the park has encountered some obstacles. Police eventually stopped to warn them about maintaining social distancing.

“I just had to announce into the mic to remind everyone to keep their distance, to stay away,” she said.

“From the start, people just wanted to play live music again. This is something that we all missed and needed. – Lea Keeley

The large open space leaves plenty of room for distance, but inevitably groups would form with a similar density to what you would see in any other large park on a bright day. This is the only time they’ve had a public health problem, Keeley said. She explained that artists are requested to bring their own microphone and instrument. If they need to use the home microphone, it is sanitized between uses and hand sanitizer is made available. As far as she knows, there has been no COVID transmission to one of the events.

The police stopped another time, but to warn them of a serious complaint. They had a battery that night, which they then stopped using later that night.

The few hiccups were not enough to slow down its success, however. The highlight for Keeley came from chance encounters.

“The feeling of a stranger walking up to you and telling you that they stumbled across the party and how much that meant to them and how it made their night or their been just to have sex again. live music – it’s really special […],” she said.

To end on a special note, Keeley reunited with his former band, Soulhouse, for their first performance in over a year. They did an acapella set of classics like “Sexual Healing” by Marvin Gaye and “September” by Earth, Wind and Fire, not realizing that it was actually the night of September 21st. Even though she was excited before the show, the last night was bittersweet.

“It’s still pretty surreal to think he’s become what he is. I’m still absorbing it all and I’m very grateful that I was able to organize these nights, ”she said.

As the open mic went off, she kicked off another project: GirlGangLive. It is a showcase focused on the presentation of women musicians in Montreal. The first event took place in Jeanne-Mance on September 17th, and Keeley is hoping to host many more.

Despite the cold, a large crowd showed up for an evening packed with performances. The last night featured open mic regulars alongside the newbies. The crowd even got an impromptu freestyle by someone who apparently wandered over to the microphone halfway through a performance.

The concert never wanted to end as night fell over the city. The last performer was followed by a sort of callback from Keeley and her friends, who continued to play one more song, calling her each time the last time, until well after the usual 11pm end. What seemed like the ultimate song was a cover of Georgia by Ray Charles in my mind, which faded as I rushed to catch the last bus home, though I wouldn’t be surprised if they continued. .



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A new hybrid edition of the POP Montreal music festival kicks off today with indoor and online performances https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/a-new-hybrid-edition-of-the-pop-montreal-music-festival-kicks-off-today-with-indoor-and-online-performances/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/a-new-hybrid-edition-of-the-pop-montreal-music-festival-kicks-off-today-with-indoor-and-online-performances/#respond Wed, 23 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/a-new-hybrid-edition-of-the-pop-montreal-music-festival-kicks-off-today-with-indoor-and-online-performances/ Just when Montrealers thought every summer festival would be canceled, the latest government permissions for indoor and outdoor gatherings have allowed events like POP Montreal to adjust and adapt. Now the festival is moving forward with a hybrid festival combining live performances – like, with real people live where you can listen to live music […]]]>

Just when Montrealers thought every summer festival would be canceled, the latest government permissions for indoor and outdoor gatherings have allowed events like POP Montreal to adjust and adapt. Now the festival is moving forward with a hybrid festival combining live performances – like, with real people live where you can listen to live music – performances with live shows. The full program is available on their website.

From today, September 23 to Sunday September 27, POP Montreal is moving forward with a selection of local acts taking place across the city, places we know and love from the roof of Rialto and the URSA club. from Martha Wainwright on Parc Avenue to the terrace of the Boxermans wine bar and restaurant in Outremont. Although tickets have been on sale for a while now, some remain (and must be purchased before you go – no tickets are available at the door of any venue).

Everything you can think of – jazz, avant-garde singers, French folk rock, metal bands, hip-hop, synth pop, the list goes on – is more or less on offer starting tonight, in addition to the exhibits. art and theatrical performances. of the visual arts branch of the ART POP music festival and symposia on a range of topics such as equity and inclusion, music business culture, music creation and listening practices and the socio-cultural impact of music (here is the link to the program of these symposia).

As for anyone who wants to avoid going in person, the festival has adjusted its online performances to have guests “walk around a virtual 2D rendition of the Rialto Theater, with access to concerts, panels and live performances. direct, ”POP Montreal added to their Instagram ad.

For anyone wishing to go, the festival has taken care to list their security protocols to make sure everyone stays safe there while they get a taste of the live music (you know , before it gets too cold outside for the musicians to play and before reaching something like red alert).

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Small venues, lifeblood of Montreal music, say they can’t survive waiting for a vaccine https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/small-venues-lifeblood-of-montreal-music-say-they-cant-survive-waiting-for-a-vaccine/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/small-venues-lifeblood-of-montreal-music-say-they-cant-survive-waiting-for-a-vaccine/#respond Thu, 02 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/small-venues-lifeblood-of-montreal-music-say-they-cant-survive-waiting-for-a-vaccine/ MONTREAL – This is one of the things Montreal is most famous for: intimate little venues that have propelled countless local musicians to international success. They are also facing their own kind of apocalypse due to COVID-19, according to people in the industry. They don’t expect to be able to reopen until there is a […]]]>

MONTREAL – This is one of the things Montreal is most famous for: intimate little venues that have propelled countless local musicians to international success.

They are also facing their own kind of apocalypse due to COVID-19, according to people in the industry. They don’t expect to be able to reopen until there is a vaccine.

The objective is to find “all possible means to try to keep these cultural institutions open, or not open but alive, until we start to vaccinate people”, explains Olivier Corbeil.

Corbeil manages three small popular venues, including Bar Le Ritz on Jean-Talon and Le Théâtre Fairmount. This week, the owners of a Plateau institution, Casa del Popolo and its sister venue La Sala Rossa, announced the final closure of their third nearby venue, La Vitrola.

Although they are technically allowed to reopen now, as bars, social distancing does not allow venues to host musical performances. Even the most established will struggle to survive the wait for a vaccine, say those who work with them.

“Nine out of ten independent venues will close” if some form of resuscitation is not provided, says Jon Weisz, who heads an association for the independent music scene in Montreal.

Many sites hold on until they see if the government will provide some kind of lifeline. “That hope is still there,” he said. But if not, expect bad news.

Montreal musicians say that small venues are just as crucial as large ones, and even more so, since no one starts on the big stage.

“You want to start with this small room, 50 people, 25 people, and you go up to a hundred and then room 400 and then you made the bigger rooms… it was important to make yourself known”, explains Jacques. Alphonse Doucet of Radio-Radio.

“No artist debuts at the Bell Center, Club Soda or Metropolis,” Weisz said. “Everyone starts at small clubs like this.

At Casa del Popolo, which played a major role in launching groups from Arcade Fire to Unicorns, co-owner Mauro Pezzante has already taken the stage off.

The place is trying to rebrand itself as a restaurant and printing house, selling posters and artwork.


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With the future of live music uncertain, Montreal concert halls may close permanently https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/with-the-future-of-live-music-uncertain-montreal-concert-halls-may-close-permanently/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/with-the-future-of-live-music-uncertain-montreal-concert-halls-may-close-permanently/#respond Mon, 29 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/with-the-future-of-live-music-uncertain-montreal-concert-halls-may-close-permanently/ While Montreal concert halls can now reopen legally, a full schedule of live and indoor concerts could still take months – and some venue owners are unsure if they can last that long. They say it is logistically and financially impossible to recreate the intimate atmosphere of live performances in small and medium-sized venues while […]]]>

While Montreal concert halls can now reopen legally, a full schedule of live and indoor concerts could still take months – and some venue owners are unsure if they can last that long.

They say it is logistically and financially impossible to recreate the intimate atmosphere of live performances in small and medium-sized venues while reducing capacity or having clients sit at separate tables, as required by the Council. health and safety at work in Quebec depending on how the establishment is authorized.

And while they are able to navigate these guidelines, it is not clear if people will come.

“We couldn’t have chosen the worst businesses to own during a pandemic,” said Olivier Corbeil, who oversees the operations of the Fairmount, Bar le Ritz PDB and Newspeak theaters.

“Each company has been at zero turnover since the end of March.”

Its halls are licensed as performance venues, which were cleared to reopen on June 24. Bars across the province were allowed to open a day later.

In a business that takes weeks, if not months, to plan events – and when it often takes a profit in a crowded room – he says he just doesn’t see how his venues can operate.

International acts are not on tour and promoters would only be allowed to sell tickets for a fraction of the 600-person capacity of the Fairmount Theater. So the venue’s calendar is empty for 2020 – and if a second wave hits this fall, the same could happen next year.

Corbeil says if it weren’t for the federal aid programs, they would already be bankrupt. But as the economy reopens, it’s unclear how long they will be able to survive.

“We’re hanging on by a thread,” Corbeil said.

Other venues have already decided to close permanently, including the Maison du Jazz in downtown Montreal and La Vitrola on Boulevard St-Laurent.

The owners of Casa del Popolo also announced on Monday that they had temporarily removed the stage from the back room of the bar, in order to make room to sell prints and other works of art.

A cautious approach

Most of the small venues in town are primarily licensed as bars. And a resurgence of new cases in the United States is leading homeowners here to take a cautious approach.

“It’s just hard to know what to focus on,” says Austin Wrinch, director and co-owner of Diving Bell Social Club, a small venue on St-Laurent Boulevard that hosts concerts, drag shows and other events.

He says that while sites can open legally, he’s not sure it would be socially responsible to do so right now.

“Our whole business is based on positive energy and vibes,” he said. “And if everyone is panicking and wearing hazmat suits and so on, it will be difficult.”

He says they plan to host cabaret-style shows with small seated crowds later this summer.

The City of Montreal announced earlier this month that it will provide financial support for concert halls as part of a $ 22 million plan to revive the economy.

Sergio Da Silva, co-owner of Turbo Haüs in the Latin Quarter, hopes that small venues are not forgotten.

He says live shows are out of the question in his venue at least for the next few months.

With most of their income normally coming from hosting concerts, the bar sells t-shirts and other merchandise to help make ends meet until it reopens this summer.

Turbo Haüs applied for a patio permit last fall. They plan to reopen this summer offering outdoor bar service, but concerts are out of the question at this time. (Turbo Haüs / Facebook)

While it was closed, the bar set up a terrace for outside service with reduced hours.

“For me, I see this as a pretty good opportunity to really train and work those muscles in terms of serving and becoming a better bar,” he said.

“I can put the shows and all that on the back burner… God knows when it’s going to come back.”


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Montreal Music Hall staff launch fundraiser after massive layoffs https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-music-hall-staff-launch-fundraiser-after-massive-layoffs/ https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-music-hall-staff-launch-fundraiser-after-massive-layoffs/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://wpfgmontreal2017.com/montreal-music-hall-staff-launch-fundraiser-after-massive-layoffs/ Staff at a dozen concert halls in Montreal lost their jobs due to COVID-19 Posted on March 26, 2020 On March 14, Quebec Minister of Culture and Communications Nathalie Roy asked all concert halls in the province to close for 30 days in order to slow the spread of the global COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. . […]]]>

Staff at a dozen concert halls in Montreal lost their jobs due to COVID-19

Posted on March 26, 2020

On March 14, Quebec Minister of Culture and Communications Nathalie Roy asked all concert halls in the province to close for 30 days in order to slow the spread of the global COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. . In response, staff from a dozen Montreal concert halls launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for a relief fund to make up for their lost wages.

The money will go to the 135 staff members who have lost their jobs as a result of these closures, to help them while their EI claims are processed, with 10% of all funds raised to be withheld as funds. emergency.

Fund recipients include staff from Bar le Ritz PDB, Casa del Popolo, La Sotteranea, La Sala Rossa, La Vitrola, L’Escogriffe, Barfly, Brasserie Beaubien, Diving Bell Social Club, Quai des Brumes, Resonance Café and Turbohaus.

Since fundraising began on March 20, nearly 300 donors have raised exactly $ 18,000 (at time of publication), which is 13.8% of the $ 130,000 goal. Organizers say they will be holding additional fundraising events, including live concerts, throughout the campaign.

Check out the full GoFundMe campaign and keep reading the organizers’ statement on fundraising.

We are raising funds to help site staff over the next month as the sites are closed and EI claims are processed. One of the things that defines Montreal is the dynamic music scene (s) that call it home. The local shows that take place day after day in places like ours.

The measures taken to combat COVID-19 have had a dramatic impact on the lives of many people. On March 14, when Culture and Communications Minister Nathalie Roy called for concert halls to be closed for 30 days, 135 workers suddenly lost their livelihood. And while this is absolutely the right decision to make, it has put financial pressure on the people who work in these spaces.

Several levels of government have promised help is on its way, but probably before the rent arrives, the pantry is empty and bills have to be paid.

As the government waived the week-long wait to access EI for those who have traveled or been infected with COVID-19 – this does not mean instant EI approval , but rather that the first week without work will be counted when EI payments start, which takes an average of 28 days. That’s why we need support over the next month.

When you go to a show, we are the people who serve you, take your coat, give your best, and clean up after you get home. If your experiences with live music have been invaluable to you, we would really appreciate your support now.

Learn more about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Canadian artists and concert halls, and follow the Exclaim list! Canadian music and film events affected by the coronavirus.


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